Agenda

Thursday, April 12, 2007

Noon Registration and Badge Pick-up Opens

Attire for COFES is weekend casual (no suits); shirts with collars; sandals or sneakers. Shorts are okay.
 

3:00
PM
Special Session: Peter Marks 

Peter Marks 
Design Insight

Winning new software customers
Winning and retaining new software customers is an issue facing many of our COFES cohorts. Pete Marks has agreed to share insight into what it takes to build and sustain a "killer application." We'll make this an interactive session, based on issues attendees bring into the session.

As last year, this is an informal. Lots of information, but also lots of interaction and discussion. 

4:00
PM
Special Session: Speculations on Thinking Nano 

Dick Morley 
Cyon Research

In the COFES spirit of throwing things out there to see what sticks, our resident "practical theorist" Dick Morley will discuss black holes, nano-tech, chocolate, and the future of the internet.
 
The physics of the black hole is a key to understanding our changing world, especially in the burgeoning international engineering environment. Crossing the gap from cosmology to nano-tech can be done, and will wake us up.

What is key is the ratio of surface area to volume. This ratio is key to chemical reactions and also to social interaction. It also is the determinant of information contained in a black hole.

Nano-tech is providing us with orders of magnitude of growth in surface to volume ratio. Batteries, food, and paint have already been direct applications for nano-tech. Somewhat surprisingly, this surface to volume issue may also apply to software, to companies, and to chocolate.

No equations will be harmed in this discussion. Dick suggests that you have three cups of coffee before entering the dragon's den. A tasting of nano-tech chocolate will be provided to participants as part of the proof of the principle.
5:00
PM
Special Session: Report from the COFES India Summit

 

Allan Behrens
Cambashi

An infomal briefing on the Cyon Research's COFES India Summit which took place in New Delhi in November. 
6:00 -
8:00
PM
Business Reception and Technology Suite Open House 

Meet the vendors that make COFES possible. Technology Suites have been set up for you to discuss corporate direction, business development, and potential partnerships. They are NOT demo rooms—the vendors are here to talk, not sell. This is your opportunity to sign up for appointment time slots.

Music, food and refreshments.
 

7:45
PM
COFES 2007 Opening Intro 

Welcome, introductions, orientation, and schedule. 

8:00 -
10:00
PM
Welcome Reception

Bring your spouse* and join all COFES attendees and sponsors for this afternoon social. 

Music, food and refreshments.


Friday, April 13, 2007


7:30
AM
Introductions and Breakfast
Each COFES attendee from the user community is assigned a leading industry consultant who will act as their host for the event. The host's primary responsibility is to make sure that you get the most value possible out of the event and introduce you to key industry players. Plan to meet your host/“introducer” for breakfast.
 
Attire for COFES is weekend casual (no suits); shirts with collars; sandals or sneakers. Shorts are okay.
 
8:30
AM
Kickoff: Opening Session and Call to Order
Your hosts, Cyon Research, will set the stage for the day's activities.  We'll set the stage for our exploration of seven developments that will have an impact on your company's future survival and success.
  
 
9:00
AM
Keynote: Bruce Sterling
Sterling~Bruce_112h.jpg

 

Sterling’s latest non-fiction book, Shaping Things discusses the coming move from the age of products and gizmos to the age of spimes -- a Sterling neologism which refers to the convergence of remote identification (RFID tags), GPS, CAD, rapid prototyping, data mining, and recycling technologies. Envisioning what is often referred to the future “Internet of Things,” Sterling predicts that the qualifiers of “virtual” and “digital” to distinguish computer-based objects from physical items will eventually fade away, as products begin to be engineered directly into our information networks.

Bruce Sterling

Bruce Sterling, author, journalist, editor, and critic, was born in 1954. Best known for his eight science fiction novels, he also writes short stories, book reviews, design criticism, opinion columns, and introductions for books ranging from Ernst Juenger to Jules Verne. His nonfiction works include THE HACKER CRACKDOWN: LAW AND DISORDER ON THE ELECTRONIC FRONTIER (1992) and TOMORROW NOW: ENVISIONING THE NEXT FIFTY YEARS (2003). He is a contributing editor of WIRED magazine. He also writes a weblog, and runs a website and Internet mailing list on the topic of environmental activism and postindustrial design. In 2005, he was the "Visionary in Residence" at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. He has appeared in ABC's Nightline, BBC's The Late Show, CBC's Morningside, on MTV and TechTV, and in Time, Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Fortune, Nature, I.D., Metropolis, Technology Review, Der Spiegel, La Repubblica, and many other venues.

For a sampling of Bruce's thoughts, listen to his recent talk on "The Internet of Things"

10:15
AM
Technology Suite Briefings 
Our Technology Suite vendors will present briefings on their advanced technology and research. Topics to be announced on site.
 

 

10:55
PM
Break
 
11:00
AM
Analyst Briefings
We've invited some of the brightest and most talented analysts and thinkers to give brief presentations on issues they view as critical, with the remainder of each 40-minute session a working discussion. These discussions are strictly limited to no more than 24 people at a time.
Sterling~Bruce_112h.jpg
Bruce Sterling
 
An interactive discussion of the topics raised in Bruce's keynote.
 
Dave Burdick
Collaborative Visions
Delivering 3D Experience to the iPOD Generation
The emergence of 3D Metaverses (SecondLife), Massive Multi-user Online Gaming (Worlds of Warcraft) and the growing mass appeal of Digital Content Creation (Autodesk, Google) is ushering in a new wave of 3D usage that extends well beyond traditional engineering applications. The younger iPOD generation regularly engages with rich variety of 3D web experiences which inevitably will raise the bar for all traditional application vendors to provide similar immersive 3D capabilities in their products. We’ll discuss the challenges and opportunities of this new paradigm.

Bruce Jenkins
SPAR Point Research

Connecting Virtual Models with the Real World
Nominal CAD systems, still the base of most BIM and PLM implementations, are seldom adequate for managing and responding to real-world conditions encountered in construction, manufacturing and asset lifecycle management. We’ll discuss how rapidly advancing 3D measurement, positioning and dimensional control technologies – 3D laser scanning, white light interferometry, flash LADAR, GPS/RTK, RFID, smart video, more – are being integrated with CAD, BIM and PLM to improve design quality, construction schedules, manufacturing costs, project safety and operations efficiency.
 
Deke Smith
Cyon Research
BIM update
Another year has passed in the BIM world, what has happened to make us think we are any closer to our goals? What has happened to the International Alliance for Interoperability? What is buildingSMART? What can we expect for the next year? How do we educate the future generation of designers, construction contractors and facility managers to be able to think outside their stovepipes?
Mike Tanner
Adexta
Web 2.0 and the future of engineering automation
Is Web 2.0 a set of new technologies, or is it just another bit of techno-babble hyped-up by vendors and analysts to differentiate a commoditizing software business? How will “Web 2.0” technologies change the way that engineering automation software evolves over the next decade?
David Prawel
LongView Advisors
3D formats and interoperability for global engineering
A keystone of engineering in a global market is efficient exchange of ideas and product information among business partners. Collaborative product development processes depend on a set of enablers. 3D is one of these enablers. A new generation of “light-weight” 3D file formats is poised to extend the value of 3D into supply chain and downstream applications.

But is 3D for everyone? People, process, and technology roadblocks slow usability and adoption rates. Is 3D ubiquity possible? What impacts 3D uptake? Where will 3D penetrate successfully and where will 2D remain dominant?

And poor interoperability continues to be a plague. Can formats like JT, DWF, and Acrobat 3D change that? Will STEP Second Edition, due this year, have an impact?
 
Jim Brown
Aberdeen
Benchmarking Lean Product Development
Lean concepts are well established in many manufacturers today. Some companies are now applying lean approaches to improve the efficiency and throughput of product development. Is lean helping in product development? Or is lean product development just more hype? We'll have an interactive discussion to learn from each other, and introduce a benchmark study that Aberdeen Group is conducting to uncover the facts behind lean product development.
 
 
11:50
AM
Analyst Briefings
Analyst briefings, round 2, with different analysts, different topics.
Steve Wolfe
Cyon Research
Integrating CAD, engineering, and manufacturing bills of material
Some product data management (PDM) systems organize CAD models and drawings. Others manage engineering bills of material that include items from multiple CAD systems or that aren’t described in a CAD system at all. Enterprise resource-planning (ERP) systems control bills of material used by manufacturing departments and suppliers. In many companies, information from the CAD PDM system must be re-keyed into the engineering BoM or the ERP system, which wastes time and causes errors. Recently PLM companies have proposed combining the CAD and engineering PDM systems into one, thereby eliminating the need to enter data twice. These solutions give rise to more problems because what’s in the CAD system doesn’t necessarily correspond to what will be manufactured. Current models for CAD, EBoM, and ERP integration are too simplistic. We’ll brainstorm about conceptual processes that might handle reality.
Jon Peddie
Jon Peddie Research
Vista -- the need for graphics
Vista is here, all seven versions of it, and at the top is Vista Ultimate; it is the most demanding on system resources, especially the graphics section. Only about 20% of the installed base of computers can run it. We’ll discuss the needs of Vista and the reality of an upgrade decision. On the table for discussion: graphics acceleration, memory, OpenGL, DirectX, application support, 64-bit, audio compatibility, security and DRM.
Allan Behrens
Cambashi
The next generation of sales models
The move from 'push' sales model to 'consent, participation, and community' is a dichotomy for many. Sales led by direct and reseller channels may not be able to compete efficiently with the new generation of new media sales models. Is there a middle ground? Can companies do both, and what, if any, are the most effective mechanisms to meet the escalating challenge?
Ken Versprille
CPDA
Transforming Art to Digital Modeling
Can technology improve the transition from pure artistic hand sketching to 3D digital solids modeling for new product development? Today, the evolution of art that captures style and aesthetics into the digital world of CAD modeling remains an error-prone, difficult task. Are answers emerging in the exploding game industry segment or in the entertainment sector?
Ed Miller
CIMdata
PLM & Automation--we're back to CIM again!
A recent industry acquisition announcement has caused a significant amount of discussion about the relationship of PLM solutions with Automation technologies. In many ways, a tight linkage between PLM and Automation is just another step in the rational evolution of PLM and continues the direction of fulfilling the promises of Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) from 25-30 years ago. This movement should be positive for industrial companies and good for the suppliers as well. But it isn't going to be easy!
Dick Morley
Cyon Research
Just beyond the horizon
Dick Morley will host a dialogue on some of the following issues in his interactive discussion.
 - Clustered systems -- and how they take a page from information theory and biology.
 - Sensors – why the number of sensors is more important that the accuracy of the sensor.
 - Computers – how iPods and gaming will “embed users into simulations”
 - Engineering – the future of “automated design” as viewed from the MIT white board
 - Wireless everywhere – including within the computer
 
Dave Jordani
Jordani Consulting Group
BIM: For Facilites Asset Management
Researches suggest that the BIM’s greatest benefits will accrue to building owners and managers responsible for the operation and maintenance of facilities. The benefits of BIM in design and construction are clear, but the reuse of BIM for downstream operations and maintenance activities has been lagging. Why? What are the opportunities and challenges that facility managers encounter as they try to turn leverage BIM for facilities and asset management?
 
 
12:40
PM
Lunch
2:15
PM
Technology Suite Briefings 
Round 2 of briefings from COFES Technology Suite vendors. Topics to be announced.
 
3:00
PM
Analyst Briefings
Analyst briefings, round 3, with different analysts, different topics.
Jerry Laiserin
LaiserinLetter
Information Integration in AECO: The Final Frontier
Each subset of the AECO community -- architects/engineers, constructors and owner/operators -- operates with its own software tools on its own data sets, information flows and life cycles. As these design, construction and operation workflows each become better integrated internally, the information hand-offs from one to the other grow ever more critical and problematic. Strategies such as interoperability or the "PLM for buildings" metaphor do not effectively address the realities of these hand-offs. Wishful thinking alone cannot make an A/E design model trustworthy to a contractor; nor make them automatically suitable for facility management (as has been recently implied). Will the industry allow design, construction, and operation to drift onto vendor-driven, higher-level islands of automation? Or, can we start a new conversation now about a truly integrated information lifecycle for buildings?
Jay Vleeschhouwer
Merrill Lynch
  Wall Street Perspective on the CAD/PLM industry
Jay Vleeschhouwer of Merrill Lynch will share his views on the outlook for the industry, what investors care about, and commentary on recent financial and merger news.
Joel Orr
Cyon Research
Where's the excitement?
Our industry is aging, and our willingness to innovate reflects it. Even the leading engineering software companies are conservative. Perhaps this is part of an almost-inevitable lifecycle in a technology market. Geoff Moore wrote about it ("Crossing the Chasm" and elsewhere). And there are strong forces to keep going the safe way, the incremental way. But when we stop having fun, we are turning away from life, and toward death. Is this how we want to live? I think not.
 
Marc Halpern
Gartner
Synchronizing bills-of-material across the enterprise
Successful PLM depends on the ability to synchronize Bills-of-Material (BOMs). As the central challenge, each BOM represents the same content with different levels of detail and abstraction, organized with different structures, and yes, even different data. Yet, content within each BOM have equivalent meeting. The discussion will center on opportunities and strategies to address this challenge.
Thomas Pennino
TP Associates
Global Engineering Product Development
Global companies have unique challenges in product development and manufacturing. Multiple global design and manufacturing centers must collaborate and integrate product introduction and life cycle management. Silicon foundries are almost entirely offshore in the Far East and there is an increasing trend to offshore silicon design, i.e. product management in the US, design in Romania and manufacture in China. We will also explore costly failures, Airbus 380, of a non-integrated global design environment. We will discuss the best practice processes and tools, such as a global product simulation environment, necessary to efficiently accomplish global design.
Peter Marks
Design Insight
New models for systems integration
Customers aren't happy with today's models of systems integration; where an army of high priced consultants descend on their organization, take years to finish their work, and all-too-commonly leave them no more competitive than before. Indeed, the result is often outright failure. This is the view many customers have had of SAP, IBM, Oracle, and the PLM and CRM leaders. We'll explore new models of systems integration, which are already beginning to displace the old.
Ray Kurland
TechniCom
Knowledge Management for Product Design
Management continually searches for ways to capture design knowledge, either from leading designers, or from successful designs. The benefits of capturing and being able to reuse such knowledge directly lead to huge productivity and quality improvements. This forms much of the basis for Lean Design. Current practices for capturing such design include both paper based methods as well as computer based methods. Many computer based methods such as rule based modeling, pseudo-programmatic methods for process capture, history based modeling, and various type of engineering notebooks have been tried over the years, but few have been generally adopted. This session will explore why this is the case and what alternatives might work in the future.
 
 
3:45
PM
Break
 
4:00
PM
First Congress: The Future of Engineering Software
This working congress is an open forum for examining the issues surrounding technologies expected to have an impact on design and engineering before 2012. The purpose of these discussions is to form a consensus on the issues faced, consider approaches, and promote further dialog.
A separate congress will be held for each of our two primary constituencies: the AEC and mechanical/manufacturing market segments.
 
Mechanical and Manufacturing Congress
 
AEC Congress
 
 
Moderated by
Brad Holtz
Cyon Research
  Moderated by Joel Orr
Cyon Research
 
5:15
PM
Free
5:45
PM
Buses leave The Scottsdale Plaza Resort for Evening Under the Stars
Buses will be leaving from the main entrance of The Scottsdale Plaza Resort*
 
*Guests of COFES Attendees must be registered and have paid a supplemental registration fee in order to attend this event 
6:30
PM
Evening Under the Stars at Desert Foothills
We're headed up into the desert to a new location this year. Once again, with truly wide-open spaces and a sweeping view of the sky. A great western cookout under the stars and a moon-free sky. And for those who want a closer look at the magnificent Arizona sky, we have a couple of major-league telescopes. A COFES highlight!
 
*Guests of COFES Attendees must be registered and have paid a supplemental registration fee in order to attend this event 
 
9:30
PM
Buses leave the Evening Event for The Scottsdale Plaza Resort
We will return to the resort between 10:00 and 11:00 pm.
 

Saturday, April 14, 2007


12:00-
6:00
PM
Income Tax Extensions
In recognition of the impending deadline of April 15 (actually, this year the deadline is Tuesday, April 17), Cyon Research has arranged for a tax specialist to be on hand to help file an extension for those that couldn't quite get it done before COFES.
8:00
AM
Breakfast
8:45
AM
Morning Kickoff
Your hosts will set the stage for the day’s activities. 
9:00
AM
Keynote: Brad Holtz

Brad Holtz
Cyon Research

Industry Update
Your host, Cyon Research Corporation, will present an update on the engineering software industry.
 
9:45
AM
Keynote: Jesse Devitte

Jesse Devitte
Borealis Ventures

Is the engineering world really flat?
The challenges and opportunities of globalization
10:30
AM
Break
 

10:45
AM

Discussions, Roundtables, and Appointments

We have set up rooms for meetings with a tight focus directed at specific groups of attendees. These 90-minute focused discussions are by the pool and near vendors' Technology Suites.

Discussions and Roundtables

 

Vendor Appointments

Meeting rooms set up in suites around the pool, each with a different issue to discuss. Also, meetings among groups with a common interest. 
 
Cyon Research investigates issues in engineering and design. That research forms the basis for the issue topics for these group discussions. The discussion topics for the COFES are:

 
Where’s My Innovate Button? No CAD software offers an Innovate Button. Yet. So how does innovation occur? Where does it occur? Can innovation be taught? Can software tools really facilitate innovation? If so, how? What role does CAD or engineering software play in developing truly innovative products? Should we expect our tools to help us innovate processes too? Are we stuck with Joy’s law, that “Innovation will happen, but that it won’t happen here”?

BIM. What does BIM really mean for the design profession? What does it mean for the rest of the AECO community? What’s with all the standards? How will this affect the practice of design and construction? What role do the software vendors play here?

Lessons From the Past. During World War II, records were set that still stand: records for time to market for such things as aircraft, aircraft carriers, tanks, etc. And they were achieved without CAE, CAD, collaboration software, PLM, ERP software, etc. Granted, the regulatory environment was simpler, we didn’t care about consequences of how we got things done, and the products themselves were much less complex than they are today, but even with those caveats what they accomplished was impressive. What was it that enabled such achievements? There are still some of us around who participated in that era. Let’s discuss what we can apply today from what was learned then.

Managing Simulation. As CAE moves to earlier portions of the design process, it is morphing into simulation and becoming more of a “what-if” tool. Simulation is ultimately what we are trying to achieve – a working model for exploration at the front end of design. For complex products, to achieve the benefits of this “what-if” tool, large numbers of parts and assemblies and configurations present a big challenge when assessing the potential impact of a proposed change. Even for not-so-complex products, the amount of information that needs to be analyzed after the simulation is large and must be managed. MSC, Ansys, Dassault Systemes, UGS, and others are starting to address this need with a new class of tool. Who needs it? What are the issues involved?

The Evolving CAD Market. “Mid-range” and “high-end” used to be valid and useful labels to differentiate the major CAD market segments. As predicted by Christensen’s Innovator’s Dilemma, what was the mid-range has acquired properties formerly limited to the domain of the high end. There are still distinct markets, but the difference between the segments is no longer accurately described by the old labels. What is the difference today? Does it matter?

All Things SOA and SaaS. Service-oriented architectures (SOA) and software as a service (SaaS) are the next big thing. Why do we care? What are the issues that need to be addressed? Are there strategies that we, as an industry, can address jointly rather than individually, to move forward more quickly? Does anyone have any idea where this will take us? Is this also a path to reduce the interoperability problem, or just another way to complicate the issue?

Second Life. Second Life is stepping out from being a novelty and into the domain of business reality. Where we are today with Second Life is probably not dissimilar to where we were with the Web in 1997 – We know it’s special and might have a big impact, but mostly we haven’t a clue as to how it will affect the way we do business six years from now. In the meantime, we want to jump in while there is an “early-mover” advantage. Are we in position to be the prospectors, or the “jeans and shovels” suppliers, of this coming “gold rush?”

User-Group Roundtable. Meeting among representatives of major user groups to discuss common issues and providing customer benefit. Representatives from boards of COE, PLM World, PTC/USER, AUGI, etc. Closed session – User-group representatives only.
 

COFES 2007 will set up appointments in the Technology Suites for attendees, based on the information you provide in the registration form, to match you with the suites that hold the technologies and companies that will interest you. Your schedule will be given to you when you arrive. There are a limited number of pre-assigned appointments. During the Thursday evening reception you will have the opportunity to expand your schedule.

The following vendors are participating in COFES 2007 with Technology Suites:

Appointment times:

10:45
11:20
11:55
12:30
  1:05
  1:40
  2:15

  2:50

Lunch will be served in the Technology Suites for the 12:30 appointments

 
12:15
PM
Lunch
 
1:45
PM 
Discussions and Roundtables
Similar to the morning sessions, with different topics.

The Globalization of Engineering. Some strong Indian development companies are acquiring more and more US and European companies. China has several independent CAD development firms, making 3D CAD products and selling them in the US. We all need to know what to do to remain competitive and viable in a market that has expanded beyond our geographic borders. Globalization of engineering is NOT synonymous with outsourcing. Outsourcing is a related issue, but one does not require the other.       Globalization of engineering is the reality that we are operating in an environment where our competitors can come from anywhere in the world, and our products need to serve a market that could be anywhere, the products need the ability to be sourced from anywhere, and that engineering, as a team sport, no longer implies single, co-located teams.

Knowledge Navigator and Drafting Dan Revisited. CAD software first appeared in print in Robert Heinlein’s 1956 The Door into Summer. The aptly named “Drafting Dan” had much of the characteristics of the best 2D systems on the market today. Apple’s 1987 concept piece, the “Knowledge Navigator,” projected the nature of interaction with a 2010-era computer – that‘s only three years away. How close are we to those visions from 20 and 50 years ago? What are the visions for 20 and 50 years from now?

Generational Change and Corporate Knowledge. Ask any architect or engineer—graduates of our current education system haven't a clue how the “real world” works. Schools teach theory, not reality. Add to that the fact that the baby-boomer generation is turning 60 and they are starting to retire in droves. How do we stop the corporate loss of deep knowledge and experience? How do we transfer it to those coming out of school with theory but no practice behind them? How do we make a difference?

Open Source. Are we open to Open? Is there leverage there? Risk? Opportunities?

3D Ubiquity and Interoperability. While DWF, PDF, JT, 3DXML, eDrawings and others are all about communicating, they serve slightly different masters – each has tasks at which it excels and others at which it doesn’t. All seem to be trying to meet a Swiss-army-knife-like array of capabilities. Because the market space is broad and the value of optimization is high, it is likely that each will be around for some time.    That said, some of the toolsets based on these formats (Autodesk Design Review, Adobe Acrobat 3D, and others) are attempting to play a role in addressing interoperability. Can this be the route to finally getting the bulk of our interoperability issue unclogged, or is it just a small improvement in the flow?

Best Practices and Infrastructures for Global Projects. Within the context of operating globally, software developers, hardware manufacturers, and users of hardware and software, are peers. This roundtable is an opportunity to share your best practices and learn from your fellow COFES participants.

Crawling Out of the Box. It used to be that mechanical design was the domain of innovation. Today’s products are a complex web of mechanical design, electronics and controls, software, etc. The Segway and any cell phone are good examples of this.
Unfortunately, our design automation tools have evolved to solve the problems of partitioned disciplines that reflect that past (our universities are similarly departmentalized). We have great products for mechanical design, for software design, etc., but we have yet to develop a great tool set that addresses the full spectrum of design. We’re beginning to see that change as we crawl out of our boxes. Where will it go from here?

Brilliantly Dumb/Absurdly Ideal.  Here are some Brilliantly Dumb ideas: • Post-It Notes • Bubble-wrap • Bent toothbrush • Glow-in-the dark condoms • Velcro • Bottled water.  And some Absurdly Ideal ideas: • What if we had a saw that cuts wood and not people? • What if we could have a hospital wherever there was a patient? • What if you could carry your record collection and your stereo in your pocket? • (circa 1920?) What if we could carry our airport with us? • (circa 1910) What if everyone was their own switchboard operator? They represent different types of innovation. Brilliantly Dumb ideas are straightforward to execute but difficult to conceive of. Both Brilliantly Dumb and Absurdly Ideal ideas are also what I would refer to as “obvious after the fact,” but Absurdly Ideal ideas add a second level of complexity in that the solution is NOT intuitively obvious. Is there a way to find Brilliantly Dumb or Absurdly Ideal ideas? How do we recognize them?
 
3:15
PM
Break
 
3:30
PM
Second Congress: The Business of Design and Engineering
This working congress is an open forum for examining the issues surrounding technologies expected to have an impact on design and engineering before 2012. The purpose of these discussions is to form a consensus on the issues faced, consider approaches, and promote further dialog.
 
On Friday we explored what is on the horizon for engineering software and how it will affect us. Saturday's Congress brings the discussion back to the reality of the business issues that face us today and the preparations we need to make to be ready for an ever-changing future.
  
Mechanical and Manufacturing Congress   AEC Congress
 
  Moderated by
Brad Holtz
Cyon Research
 
 
 
Moderated by
Joel Orr
Cyon Research
 
5:00
PM
Free
5:30
PM
Reception
*Guests of COFES Attendees must be registered and have paid a supplemental registration fee in order to attend this event 
6:30-
9:00
PM
Dinner and Awards

Dinner and the closing session of COFES 2007, and The CAD Society Industry Awards. *
 
*Guests of COFES Attendees must be registered and have paid a supplemental registration fee in order to attend this event 

Agenda: Friday, April 13, 2007


7:30

AM
Introductions and Breakfast

Each COFES attendee from the user community is assigned a leading industry consultant who will act as their host for the event. The host's primary responsibility is to make sure that you get the most value possible out of the event and introduce you to key industry players. Plan to meet your host/“introducer” for breakfast.


Attire for COFES is weekend casual (no suits); shirts with collars; sandals or sneakers. Shorts are okay
8:30

AM
Kickoff: Opening Session and Call to Order

Your hosts, Cyon Research, will set the stage for the day's activities.  We'll set the stage for our exploration of seven developments that will have an impact on your company's future survival and success.

9:00

AM
Keynote: Bruce Sterling

Sterling~Bruce_112h.jpg  
Sterling’s latest non-fiction book, Shaping Things discusses the coming move from the age of products and gizmos to the age of spimes -- a Sterling neologism which refers to the convergence of remote identification (RFID tags), GPS, CAD, rapid prototyping, data mining, and recycling technologies. Envisioning what is often referred to the future “Internet of Things,” Sterling predicts that the qualifiers of “virtual” and “digital” to distinguish computer-based objects from physical items will eventually fade away, as products begin to be engineered directly into our information networks.


Bruce Sterling

Bruce Sterling, author, journalist, editor, and critic, was born in 1954. Best known for his eight science fiction novels, he also writes short stories, book reviews, design criticism, opinion columns, and introductions for books ranging from Ernst Juenger to Jules Verne. His nonfiction works include THE HACKER CRACKDOWN: LAW AND DISORDER ON THE ELECTRONIC FRONTIER (1992) and TOMORROW NOW: ENVISIONING THE NEXT FIFTY YEARS (2003). He is a contributing editor of WIRED magazine. He also writes a weblog, and runs a website and Internet mailing list on the topic of environmental activism and postindustrial design. In 2005, he was the "Visionary in Residence" at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. He has appeared in ABC's Nightline, BBC's The Late Show, CBC's Morningside, on MTV and TechTV, and in Time, Newsweek, The Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Fortune, Nature, I.D., Metropolis, Technology Review, Der Spiegel, La Repubblica, and many other venues.

For a sampling of Bruce's thoughts, listen to his recent talk on "The Internet of Things"

10:15

AM
Technology Suite Briefings 
Our Technology Suite vendors will present briefings on their advanced technology and research. Topics to be announced on site.

 



10:55

PM
Break
 
11:00

AM
Analyst Briefings

We've invited some of the brightest and most talented analysts and thinkers to give brief presentations on issues they view as critical, with the remainder of each 40-minute session a working discussion. These discussions are strictly limited to no more than 24 people at a time.

Sterling~Bruce_112h.jpg  
Bruce Sterling
 

An interactive discussion of the topics raised in Bruce's keynote.

 





 
Dave Burdick

Collaborative Visions
Delivering 3D Experience to the iPOD Generation

The emergence of 3D Metaverses (SecondLife), Massive Multi-user Online Gaming (Worlds of Warcraft) and the growing mass appeal of Digital Content Creation (Autodesk, Google) is ushering in a new wave of 3D usage that extends well beyond traditional engineering applications. The younger iPOD generation regularly engages with rich variety of 3D web experiences which inevitably will raise the bar for all traditional application vendors to provide similar immersive 3D capabilities in their products. We’ll discuss the challenges and opportunities of this new paradigm.
 

Bruce Jenkins

SPAR Point Research


Connecting Virtual Models with the Real World

Nominal CAD systems, still the base of most BIM and PLM implementations, are seldom adequate for managing and responding to real-world conditions encountered in construction, manufacturing and asset lifecycle management. We’ll discuss how rapidly advancing 3D measurement, positioning and dimensional control technologies – 3D laser scanning, white light interferometry, flash LADAR, GPS/RTK, RFID, smart video, more – are being integrated with CAD, BIM and PLM to improve design quality, construction schedules, manufacturing costs, project safety and operations efficiency.

 


 
Deke Smith

Cyon Research
BIM update

Another year has passed in the BIM world, what has happened to make us think we are any closer to our goals? What has happened to the International Alliance for Interoperability? What is buildingSMART? What can we expect for the next year? How do we educate the future generation of designers, construction contractors and facility managers to be able to think outside their stovepipes?

 
Mike Tanner

Adexta
Web 2.0 and the future of engineering automation

Is Web 2.0 a set of new technologies, or is it just another bit of techno-babble hyped-up by vendors and analysts to differentiate a commoditizing software business? How will “Web 2.0” technologies change the way that engineering automation software evolves over the next decade?

 
David Prawel

LongView Advisors
3D formats and interoperability for global engineering

A keystone of engineering in a global market is efficient exchange of ideas and product information among business partners. Collaborative product development processes depend on a set of enablers. 3D is one of these enablers. A new generation of “light-weight” 3D file formats is poised to extend the value of 3D into supply chain and downstream applications.



But is 3D for everyone? People, process, and technology roadblocks slow usability and adoption rates. Is 3D ubiquity possible? What impacts 3D uptake? Where will 3D penetrate successfully and where will 2D remain dominant?



And poor interoperability continues to be a plague. Can formats like JT, DWF, and Acrobat 3D change that? Will STEP Second Edition, due this year, have an impact?

 

 
Jim Brown

Aberdeen
Benchmarking Lean Product Development

Lean concepts are well established in many manufacturers today. Some companies are now applying lean approaches to improve the efficiency and throughput of product development. Is lean helping in product development? Or is lean product development just more hype? We'll have an interactive discussion to learn from each other, and introduce a benchmark study that Aberdeen Group is conducting to uncover the facts behind lean product development.

 
 

11:50

AM
Analyst Briefings

Analyst briefings, round 2, with different analysts, different topics.







 
Steve Wolfe

Cyon Research
Integrating CAD, engineering, and manufacturing bills of material

Some product data management (PDM) systems organize CAD models and drawings. Others manage engineering bills of material that include items from multiple CAD systems or that aren’t described in a CAD system at all. Enterprise resource-planning (ERP) systems control bills of material used by manufacturing departments and suppliers. In many companies, information from the CAD PDM system must be re-keyed into the engineering BoM or the ERP system, which wastes time and causes errors. Recently PLM companies have proposed combining the CAD and engineering PDM systems into one, thereby eliminating the need to enter data twice. These solutions give rise to more problems because what’s in the CAD system doesn’t necessarily correspond to what will be manufactured. Current models for CAD, EBoM, and ERP integration are too simplistic. We’ll brainstorm about conceptual processes that might handle reality.
 
Jon Peddie

Jon Peddie Research
Vista -- the need for graphics

Vista is here, all seven versions of it, and at the top is Vista Ultimate; it is the most demanding on system resources, especially the graphics section. Only about 20% of the installed base of computers can run it. We’ll discuss the needs of Vista and the reality of an upgrade decision. On the table for discussion: graphics acceleration, memory, OpenGL, DirectX, application support, 64-bit, audio compatibility, security and DRM.
 
Allan Behrens

Cambashi
The next generation of sales models

The move from 'push' sales model to 'consent, participation, and community' is a dichotomy for many. Sales led by direct and reseller channels may not be able to compete efficiently with the new generation of new media sales models. Is there a middle ground? Can companies do both, and what, if any, are the most effective mechanisms to meet the escalating challenge?
 
Ken Versprille

CPDA
Transforming Art to Digital Modeling

Can technology improve the transition from pure artistic hand sketching to 3D digital solids modeling for new product development? Today, the evolution of art that captures style and aesthetics into the digital world of CAD modeling remains an error-prone, difficult task. Are answers emerging in the exploding game industry segment or in the entertainment sector?
 
Ed Miller

CIMdata
PLM & Automation--we're back to CIM again!

A recent industry acquisition announcement has caused a significant amount of discussion about the relationship of PLM solutions with Automation technologies. In many ways, a tight linkage between PLM and Automation is just another step in the rational evolution of PLM and continues the direction of fulfilling the promises of Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) from 25-30 years ago. This movement should be positive for industrial companies and good for the suppliers as well. But it isn't going to be easy!
 
Dick Morley

Cyon Research
Just beyond the horizon

Dick Morley will host a dialogue on some of the following issues in his interactive discussion.

 - Clustered systems -- and how they take a page from information theory and biology.

 - Sensors – why the number of sensors is more important that the accuracy of the sensor.

 - Computers – how iPods and gaming will “embed users into simulations”

 - Engineering – the future of “automated design” as viewed from the MIT white board

 - Wireless everywhere – including within the computer

 
 
Dave Jordani

Jordani Consulting Group
BIM: For Facilites Asset Management

Researches suggest that the BIM’s greatest benefits will accrue to building owners and managers responsible for the operation and maintenance of facilities. The benefits of BIM in design and construction are clear, but the reuse of BIM for downstream operations and maintenance activities has been lagging. Why? What are the opportunities and challenges that facility managers encounter as they try to turn leverage BIM for facilities and asset management?

 
 

12:40

PM
Lunch
2:15

PM
Technology Suite Briefings 

Round 2 of briefings from COFES Technology Suite vendors. Topics to be announced.


3:00

PM
Analyst Briefings

Analyst briefings, round 3, with different analysts, different topics.


 
Jerry Laiserin

LaiserinLetter
Information Integration in AECO: The Final Frontier

Each subset of the AECO community -- architects/engineers, constructors and owner/operators -- operates with its own software tools on its own data sets, information flows and life cycles. As these design, construction and operation workflows each become better integrated internally, the information hand-offs from one to the other grow ever more critical and problematic. Strategies such as interoperability or the "PLM for buildings" metaphor do not effectively address the realities of these hand-offs. Wishful thinking alone cannot make an A/E design model trustworthy to a contractor; nor make them automatically suitable for facility management (as has been recently implied). Will the industry allow design, construction, and operation to drift onto vendor-driven, higher-level islands of automation? Or, can we start a new conversation now about a truly integrated information lifecycle for buildings?
 
Jay Vleeschhouwer

Merrill Lynch
  Wall Street Perspective on the CAD/PLM industry

Jay Vleeschhouwer of Merrill Lynch will share his views on the outlook for the industry, what investors care about, and commentary on recent financial and merger news.
 
Joel Orr

Cyon Research
Where's the excitement?

Our industry is aging, and our willingness to innovate reflects it. Even the leading engineering software companies are conservative. Perhaps this is part of an almost-inevitable lifecycle in a technology market. Geoff Moore wrote about it ("Crossing the Chasm" and elsewhere). And there are strong forces to keep going the safe way, the incremental way. But when we stop having fun, we are turning away from life, and toward death. Is this how we want to live? I think not.

 
 
Marc Halpern

Gartner
Synchronizing bills-of-material across the enterprise

Successful PLM depends on the ability to synchronize Bills-of-Material (BOMs). As the central challenge, each BOM represents the same content with different levels of detail and abstraction, organized with different structures, and yes, even different data. Yet, content within each BOM have equivalent meeting. The discussion will center on opportunities and strategies to address this challenge.
 
Thomas Pennino

TP Associates
Global Engineering Product Development

Global companies have unique challenges in product development and manufacturing. Multiple global design and manufacturing centers must collaborate and integrate product introduction and life cycle management. Silicon foundries are almost entirely offshore in the Far East and there is an increasing trend to offshore silicon design, i.e. product management in the US, design in Romania and manufacture in China. We will also explore costly failures, Airbus 380, of a non-integrated global design environment. We will discuss the best practice processes and tools, such as a global product simulation environment, necessary to efficiently accomplish global design.
 
Peter Marks

Design Insight
New models for systems integration

Customers aren't happy with today's models of systems integration; where an army of high priced consultants descend on their organization, take years to finish their work, and all-too-commonly leave them no more competitive than before. Indeed, the result is often outright failure. This is the view many customers have had of SAP, IBM, Oracle, and the PLM and CRM leaders. We'll explore new models of systems integration, which are already beginning to displace the old.
 
Ray Kurland

TechniCom
Knowledge Management for Product Design

Management continually searches for ways to capture design knowledge, either from leading designers, or from successful designs. The benefits of capturing and being able to reuse such knowledge directly lead to huge productivity and quality improvements. This forms much of the basis for Lean Design. Current practices for capturing such design include both paper based methods as well as computer based methods. Many computer based methods such as rule based modeling, pseudo-programmatic methods for process capture, history based modeling, and various type of engineering notebooks have been tried over the years, but few have been generally adopted. This session will explore why this is the case and what alternatives might work in the future.

 
 

3:45

PM
Break
 
4:00

PM
First Congress: The Future of Engineering Software
This working congress is an open forum for examining the issues surrounding technologies expected to have an impact on design and engineering before 2012. The purpose of these discussions is to form a consensus on the issues faced, consider approaches, and promote further dialog.

A separate congress will be held for each of our two primary constituencies: the AEC and mechanical/manufacturing market segments.

 

Mechanical and Manufacturing Congress


 

AEC Congress



 
 


Moderated by

Brad Holtz

Cyon Research



  Moderated by Joel Orr

Cyon Research

 
5:15

PM
Free
5:45

PM
Buses leave The Scottsdale Plaza Resort for Evening Under the Stars
Buses will be leaving from the main entrance of The Scottsdale Plaza Resort*

*Guests of COFES Attendees must be registered and have paid a supplemental registration fee in order to attend this event 
6:30

PM
Evening Under the Stars at Desert Foothills
We're headed up into the desert to a new location this year. Once again, with truly wide-open spaces and a sweeping view of the sky. A great western cookout under the stars and a moon-free sky. And for those who want a closer look at the magnificent Arizona sky, we have a couple of major-league telescopes. A COFES highlight!

*Guests of COFES Attendees must be registered and have paid a supplemental registration fee in order to attend this event
 
9:30

PM
Buses leave the Evening Event for The Scottsdale Plaza Resort
We will return to the resort between 10:00 and 11:00 pm.


 


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