COFES 2008 Agenda

Thursday, April 10, 2008

Noon Registration and Badge Pick-up Opens

Attire for COFES is weekend casual (no suits); shirts with collars; sandals or sneakers. Shorts are okay.
 

2:30
PM

 
Special Session: The Practicality Gap 

 

Kathleen Maher 
Jon Peddie Research

Somewhere between the Hype Curve and the other side of the Chasm there is the Practicality Gap. We've all seen products or technologies introduced that seem like obvious winners. The first thought upon seeing them is, why didn't anyone think of this before? The second is I want that. But when it comes to the real world, they languish. What went wrong? It takes more than a good idea to make a product or technology success, it takes a ready market, a proper ecosystem, and a base of educated potential customers. The Practicality Gap is a way of looking at an idea and evaluating its readiness for success.
 

Open to all COFES and ii2008 attendees and their guests.

3:00
PM

 
Special Session: The Sustainability Paradox 

 

Ken Hall 
Gensler

Is de-carbonizing the economy our greatest economic opportunity since we mobilized for WWII? Is it even the right focus?
 
Join us in an interactive journey into the paradox of sustainability. What is the paradox? We’ll explore three fast vignettes on sustainability. First, a quick journey through time. Next, we’ll look at emerging models of sustainability. Finally, some innovative ideas about transforming human organizations.
 

As last year, this is an informal session. Lots of information, but also lots of interaction and discussion.

Open to all COFES and ii2008 attendees and their guests.

4:00
PM

 
Special Session: Industry Update on Design Tools for the Nano Scale

 

Mark Sims 
Nanorex

Will structural DNA nanotechnology (SDN) play a key role in bootstrapping the next industrial revolution as many now believe? If so, CAD software will be a key enabler for SDN research and development toward commercial applications. Nanoelectronics, nanomechanical devices and the creation of new materials are among the potential applications. Mark will explain how DNA is used as a vehicle for constructing nanodevices and present some real-world examples.

Mark will also give us a sneak preview of the world's first 3D CAD system for the design, simulation and synthesis of self-assembled DNA-based 3D nanostructures.
 

Mark is the president of Nanorex, a company he founded with our COFES 2002 keynote speaker Eric Drexler.
 

As last year, this is an informal session. Lots of information, but also lots of interaction and discussion.

Open to all COFES and ii2008 attendees and their guests.

5:00
PM

 
Special Session: Needs, Wants, and the Future of Engineering

 

Peter Marks 
Design Insight

Economic Drivers as a Tool for Predicting Demand for Software
 
The economy is a mess. Is this a problem -- or an opportunity -- for the engineering and engineering software community?  

We'll review a dozen key issues facing us (our "needs") and the innovation opportunities each of these provides for engineering to respond. In many areas of greatest need, it also turns out a better understanding of customers (their "wants") is required to get us where we want to go. The session has two objectives. First, to stir thinking for the two days ahead. Second, to give each participant an actionable idea or two to improve their own corner of the global economy. Turn disruption into opportunity!
 

As last year, this is an informal session. Lots of information, but also lots of interaction and discussion.

Open to all COFES and ii2008 attendees and their guests.

6:00 -
8:00
PM

 
Business Reception and Technology Suite Open House   Spouse & Guest-only Mixer 

Opening business reception. First formal opportunity for COFES Newbies to meet their Hosts. Technology Suites have been set up for you to discuss corporate direction, business development, and potential partnerships. They are NOT demo rooms—the vendors are here to talk, not sell. This is your opportunity to sign up for appointment time slots.
Music, food and refreshments.

*Restricted to COFES 2008 and ii2008 attendees. Their spouses and guests are invited to a spouse- and guest-only mixer and may join them later at the welcome reception.

While COFES and ii2008 attendees are at their business reception, their spouses and guests will be treated to a wine tasting reception before they join us in the welcome reception at 8 pm. Enjoy the food, refreshements, and music in a relaxed setting.

*Open only to badged spouses/guests of COFES 2008 and ii2008 attendees.

7:45
PM

 
COFES 2008 Opening Intro

Welcome, introductions, orientation, and schedule.

8:00 -
10:00
PM

 
Welcome Reception

Bring your spouse and join all COFES and ii2008 attendees and sponsors for this evening social.

Music, food and refreshments.

*Guests of COFES and ii2008 Attendees must be registered and must be wearing their badge during the event.


Friday, April 11, 2008


7:30
AM

 
Introductions and Breakfast
Each COFES attendee from the user community is assigned a leading industry consultant who will act as their host for the event. The host's primary responsibility is to make sure that you get the most value possible out of the event and introduce you to key industry players. Plan to meet your host/“introducer” for breakfast.
 
Attire for COFES is weekend casual (no suits); shirts with collars; sandals or sneakers. Shorts are okay.
 
8:30
AM

 
Kickoff: Opening Session and Call to Order
Your hosts, Cyon Research, will set the stage for the day's activities.  We'll set the stage for our exploration of seven developments that will have an impact on your company's future survival and success.
   
9:00
AM

 
Keynote: Extreme-Value Innovation 
Ulrich~Karl_191x150.jpg  
Karl Ulrich
The Wharton School
Extremely valuable innovations are usually based on statistically exceptional opportunities. In most settings, organizations use tournaments to find these exceptional opportunities, by which I mean they generate many candidate opportunities and develop and filter them until only the very best remain. Although the basic idea of a tournament is common in industrial practice, very little science has been brought to bear on the problem of generating more, better opportunities and on more accurately evaluating and selecting the exceptional few. In this keynote I lay out a science of extreme-value innovation, illustrating how the somewhat random process of identifying and selecting opportunities can be managed more deliberately. I then turn to the question of how information technology might be brought to bear on this larger problem of innovation.
 
Karl Ulrich
Karl Ulrich is the CIBC Professor and Chair of the Operations and Information Management Department at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He also holds a secondary appointment as Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Ulrich is the faculty director of the Weiss Tech House, an incubator for fostering student innovation. Professor Ulrich's research activities are focused on innovation, design, and product development. Professor Ulrich's past and present research partners include Hewlett-Packard, Merck, and Dell. His work appears in, among other journals, Management Science, Marketing Science, California Management Review, Research Policy, and ASME Journal of Mechanical Design. He is a co-author of Product Design and Development (McGraw-Hill, 4th Edition, 2007), the leading graduate textbook on product design. He is the winner of many teaching awards, including the Anvil Award, the Miller-Sherrerd Award, and the Excellence in Teaching Award at The Wharton School. Professor Ulrich has been a member of development teams for over 30 new products or processes, including medical devices, tools, computer peripherals, food products, and sporting goods. As a result of this development work, he has been granted 18 patents. From 1999-2002, while on leave from Wharton, Ulrich founded and managed Nova Cruz Products (now Xootr LLC), a manufacturer of high-performance personal transportation products including the Xootr scooter and Swift bicycle. He recently co-founded Terrapass, which the New York Times featured as one of the most noteworthy ideas of 2005. Professor Ulrich holds bachelors, masters, and doctoral degrees in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
10:15
AM

 
Technology Suite Briefings 
Our Technology Suite vendors will present briefings on their advanced technology and research.
  
 
Ashlar-Vellum
Robert Bou
President
Organic Workflow: Essential for Consumer Product Design
Ashlar-Vellum will present how organic workflow within product design software fosters innovation and compelling form.
 
 
Autodesk
Robert "Buzz" Kross
Senior Vice-President, Manufacturing Solutions
Digital Prototyping
Why isn’t everyone doing digital prototyping, and could digital prototyping help manufacturers create products that are sustainable by design?
 
 
The CAD Society
Mike McGrath
President, The CAD Society
A New Vision
The CAD Society will present its new vision for its role within the globlal CAD community.
 
 
IBM
Robert Norton
Program Director, IBM PLM
IBM's Vision for PLM
As companies continue to search for predictable success in an ever increasing competitive marketplace, they are viewing PLM as an expanded practice that can support a successful product launch as well as address customer needs and satisfaction issues throughout the life of a product. Robert Norton from IBM will discuss the business issues impacting companies today and he will define how PLM can help meet a variety of business challenges. He will provide an overview of the future of PLM, IBM's PLM strategy, and what IBM clients are saying about the need to have a smooth flow of information exchange across the extended supply chain. Norton will demonstrate how IBM can help companies tap into new technologies to help reduce complexity and create models and best practices that support an open and collaborative approach to PLM.
 
 
Infinite Z
Paul Kellenberger
President & CEO
3D Display: Transforming the Way You Interact With Your Computer
Infinite Z will discuss their vision for 3D desktop display and their next-generation solution for "real-life" display.
 
 
PTC
Michael Campbell
Senior Vice-President, Product Management
Product First
PTC will discuss their vision for PLM.
 
 
Siemens PLM Software
Tord Dennis
Product Marketing Manager
Green by Design
At Siemens PLM Software we have a proven track record of delivering world-class products and services, empowering our customers to deal swiftly with emerging risks and opportunities. We believe that a holistic approach to PLM is the solution to meeting rising resource needs in ways that are cost efficient, sustainable and environmentally compatible while achieving their innovation initiatives. Becoming green reaches beyond compliance and makes sense for your bottom line.
 

 
ii2008* Session
Richard Probst
SAP Labs
Innovation Through Crowdsourcing
Innovation can’t be bought and boxed—that’s why off the shelf solutions don’t meet the ongoing needs of a company that thrives on differentiation. The best way to gain the insights required to adapt and grow is through knowledge sharing and knowledge transfer among like-minded communities of innovation. We’ll look into a case study of SAP's enterprise service community, which has been a breakthrough model for innovation across business networks. We’ll address leveraging the power of communities to identify, innovate, and support solutions that engage customers and partners throughout the IT lifecycle.
 
10:55
PM

 
Break
 
11:00
AM

 
Analyst Briefings
We've invited some of the brightest and most talented analysts and thinkers to give brief presentations on issues they view as critical, with the remainder of each 40-minute session a working discussion. These discussions are strictly limited to no more than 24 people at a time.
 

 
Karl Ulrich
The Wharton School
Keynoter's Session

An interactive discussion on the topics raised in Karl's keynote.  
 
Steve Wolfe
Cyon Research
Beyond History-Based and Explicit Modeling
Spaceclaim, Kubotek, Ashlar, and the purchase of CoCreate by PTC have re-ignited the debate over explicit versus history-based 3D modeling. Each method has its advantages but can we conceive of systems that combine the benefits of both? What would such systems be like and how would they work?
 
 
Allan Behrens
Cambashi
Where Next for Engineering Software?
Who or what will force the next significant change in engineering software? Will the change be motivated by changing demand, new technology or a shift in the usability paradigm to cater for future users? Will it be an established player or a new entrant? Whatever the case, the ‘next big thing’ appears to be somewhat overdue.
 
 
Jon Peddie
Jon Peddie Research
The Blurred Line Between Games and Simulation
It’s a game – no, it’s a simulation – wait, you’re both right! With the advent of GPUs, the effects of Moore’s law, and the subsequent advances in graphics and database programming, what used to be a nice fat black line between games and “serious” simulation/Visualization programs has blurred to a very thin gray line. It is the democratization of Viz/Sim – VolksSim. We’ll discuss the developments of games and how they rival “professional” simulation/Visualization programs, and where they don’t.
 
Jay Vleeschhouwer
Merrill Lynch
Wall Street Perspective on the CAD/PLM industry

Jay Vleeschhouwer of Merrill Lynch will lead this discussion on the outlook for the industry, on recent financial and merger news, and on what investors care about.
 
Martin Fischer
CIFE
Extending BIM Beyond Architecture and Construction
Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) tools like BIM are bound to increase to larger and smaller physical, temporal, and organizational scales. We’ll explore these new developments and the potential for an extended scope and reach of VDC/BIM.
 
 
Dave Jordani
Jordani Consulting Group
BIM: A Disruptive Tool to Fix a Broken Process?

The terms ‘BIM’ and ‘disruptive’ have been used together often. Disruptive is typically a term for a sign of trouble. That may not be the case here. Can we view BIM as the catalyst to unsettle and shake up the current practice of design and construction? It’s long overdue. We’ll explore what’s underneath this change and the newly unfolding practice- and business-models for the migration period.  

 
ii2008* Session
Rudy Lagattolla
Scientec Italia
Innovating Tourism
For many countries and regions, tourism is a critical and fundamental aspect of the local economy. In the case of Italy, tourism represents a cornerstone piece of the economy. Yet tourism is rarely managed in the same way that a product or service offering is in a large organization. To help foster and drive tourism, Rudy and his team put in place a novel and innovative approach to Customer Relationship Management that would leave an indelible impression on tourists.
 
 
11:50
AM

 
Analyst Briefings
Analyst briefings, round 2, with different analysts, different topics.

 
Joel Orr
Cyon Research
Mapping the CAE Market
Cyon Research has spent much of the past year developing a market map of the CAE industry. During this session we’ll discuss our research and its implications.
 
 
Peter Marks
Design Insight
Masters of Better Engineering — The New $1B Systems Integration Market
Our discussion is aimed primarily at key software vendors and resellers serving the mid range, plus users from small and medium sized design and manufacturing companies. We'll outline an innovative plan to do to the big systems integration outfits what Southwest Airlines did to American, Delta, United and the rest of the higher priced incumbents.
 
 
Dave Burdick
Collaborative Visions
Consumers: The Next Frontier for Engineering Software?
With the market for business and professional engineering software perhaps nearing saturation, some engineering software vendors are looking to an emerging consumer market for new growth. Are they serious? Can our business-oriented vendor community really compete for the hearts, minds, and dollars of the iPod and gaming consumers? We’ll examine the merits and ability of the engineering software vendors to make an impact in this market and assess the technological and market factors that may influence their success.
 
 
 
Ken Versprille
CPDA
Model-Based Design
Model-Based Definition (MBD) incorporates extensive product information beyond shape, including dimensions, GD&T, and annotations into the 3D model. Communicating complete and accurate product data between product stakeholders is critical. Adopting MBD allows companies to centralize all necessary product information in one 3D database, and also eliminates the task of generating 2D drawings. MBD can be leveraged, not only across engineering domains, but on the manufacturing floor and in corporate marketing, sales, and services organizations.
 
 
Jim Brown
Aberdeen
Near-Term Futures for Product Innovation
Competition in a market of limited growth results in companies trying to “out-innovate” each other. How are they driving this innovation? What are companies doing to move innovation from a random act of chance to a more repeatable, predictable process? We’ve seen some companies begin to "operationalize" product innovation. We’ll discuss this and related processes like open innovation, organizational approaches to innovation, and enabling technologies.
 
 
 

Bruce Jenkins
SPAR Point Research

3D Worlds – Virtual Meets Real
New 3D data capture systems based on laser scanning, LIDAR, high-dynamic-range and gigapixel photography, sonar, GPS, and inertial navigation technologies are challenging organizations to rethink how they use 3D data for efficient and safe operations. We’ll discuss how these technologies are beginning to close the loop between BIM and PLM implementations and the real world.
 
Chuck Eastman
Georgia Tech
BIM: After Clash-Detection, Then What?

3D modeling and virtual construction is a wonderful step toward eliminating errors in the construction process. Once conquered, what are the other benefits of BIM for construction? A discussion of the longer term implications.
 

 
ii2008* Session
Bryan Baker
Xerox
Convergys Case Study
Customer communication is the vital link in the most fundamental aspect of innovation—the conversation between companies and their customers. It’s also an operation in which innovation is critical and where outsourcing processes are highly strategic. We’ll look at how Convergys Corporation fueled its ability to innovate by implementing a global document management strategy, encompassing both outbound and inbound communication. We’ll also explore how Convergys was able to drive innovation while driving down costs for clients and their own services, and how the company transformed their clients’ business operations.
 
  
12:40
PM

 
Lunch
 
2:15
PM

 
Technology Suite Briefings 
Round 2 of briefings from COFES Technology Suite vendors.
 
 
Ashlar-Vellum
Julie Bou
Vice-President
Organic Workflow: Essential for Consumer Product Design
Ashlar-Vellum will present how organic workflow within product design software fosters innovation and compelling form.
 
 
Autodesk
Robert "Buzz" Kross
Senior Vice-President, Manufacturing Solutions
Digital Prototyping
Why isn’t everyone doing digital prototyping, and could digital prototyping help manufacturers create products that are sustainable by design?
 
 
The CAD Society
Mike McGrath
President, The CAD Society
A New Vision
The CAD Society will present its new vision for its role within the globlal CAD community.
 
 
IBM
Robert Norton
Program Director, IBM PLM
IBM's Vision for PLM
As companies continue to search for predictable success in an ever increasing competitive marketplace, they are viewing PLM as an expanded practice that can support a successful product launch as well as address customer needs and satisfaction issues throughout the life of a product. Robert Norton from IBM will discuss the business issues impacting companies today and he will define how PLM can help meet a variety of business challenges. He will provide an overview of the future of PLM, IBM's PLM strategy, and what IBM clients are saying about the need to have a smooth flow of information exchange across the extended supply chain. Norton will demonstrate how IBM can help companies tap into new technologies to help reduce complexity and create models and best practices that support an open and collaborative approach to PLM.
 
 
Infinite Z
Paul Kellenberger
President & CEO
3D Display: Transforming the Way You Interact With Your Computer
Infinite Z will discuss their vision for 3D desktop display and their next-generation solution for "real-life" display.
 
 
PTC
Uli Mahle
Vice-President, CoCreate
Direct Modeling
PTC will discuss their vision for their CoCreate acquisition.
 
 
Siemens PLM Software
Bill Carrelli
Vice-President, Strategic Marketing and Business Development
Siemens' Vision for Manufacturing
 
 

 
ii2008* Session
Christian De Neef
Biznessence
Open Innovation
Explore the common space and the potential synergies between knowledge and innovation management. Despite increasing pressure, innovation companies still can't quantify benefits (ROI) from their innovation programs, partly because innovation management has not crossed organizational boundaries. But crossing those boundaries necessitates new innovation management approaches. Open innovation requires a new, collaborative, value-driven approach to R&D. Closer synergy between KM and innovation practices would certainly benefit the innovation process. So where do Innovation and KM actually meet? And how does the latter support the former? We’ll explore the Open Innovation paradigm in the light of KM and the extensive requirements for KM to fully support innovation.
 
3:00
PM

 
Analyst Briefings
Analyst briefings, round 3, with different analysts, different topics.
 
 
 
Brad Holtz
Cyon Research
What's Behind the Next Big Thing?
Cyon Research has long been studying the factors behind market movements. In addition to discussing aspects over which we have some control, we’ll also address a wide range of elements outside of our direct influence, including crossing verticals, demographics, a sloped global playing field, energy, legal and political infrastructure, social networking, etc., that will create the context for the Next Big Thing.
 
 
Dick Morley
Cyon Research
Speculations on Thinking Nano
Our resident "practical theorist" Dick Morley will discuss black holes, nano-tech, chocolate, and the future of the Internet.
 
 
Marc Halpern
Gartner
Harmonizing Product Design and Manufacturing Processes
We’ll address the emerging discipline of Manufacturing Process Management (MPM). MPM practice requires teams with expertise that spans product design, simulation, manufacturing engineering and process modeling, and software/data architecture across ERP, MES, and PLM. Join us as we explore the technical, process, and cultural issues that manufacturers face to improve this stage of the product lifecycle.
 
 
David Prawel
LongView Advisors
Applying "Lean" to Design
Manufacturers have focused on “lean thinking” to eliminate waste, reduce cost, shorten lead times and improve quality. But few people are aware of how much waste there is in design—most have never even considered it. How much time is wasted on activities that don’t add value? We’ll discuss applying lean principles to design and engineering in order to address issues like errors in CAD data, manual vs. automated drawing/graphics, and miscommunication.
 
 
John Mackrell
CIMdata
Capturing & Reusing Knowledge in Product Development
We'll discuss issues related to, and techniques for, capturing and facilitating the reuse of product development knowledge. Topics will include our successes, failures, special techniques, security, and knowledge dissemination. Also, we’ll explore the impact of knowledge capture on innovation and business success.
 
 
Tom Pennino
TP Technologies
Rethinking Outsourcing and Offshore Design and Manufacturing
Competitive advantage, in today’s global economy, is derived through utilizing global design and manufacturing resources. Given the current exchange rates and especially the strength of the Euro, outsourcing or going offshore for design and manufacturing may not necessarily achieve competitive or cost advantage. We’ll explore technology trends and processes that achieve a cost effective and competitive global design and manufacturing environment.
 
 
Joe Morray
Trinity Technologies
The Digital Landfill: When is Data an Asset?
The AEC world has significantly developed the ability to create information, but lags behind in converting this to intelligent designs, rules-based algorithms, and optimizing the resulting facilities. We’ll discuss best practices and opportunities for converting data into value-producing functions.
 

 
ii2008* Session
Sijin Karayal
National Instruments
Enterprise Content with Intelligence
National Instruments received accolades for its innovation in creating a search-driven innovation for integrating enterprise content, which enhances information intelligence and effective information discovery. We’ll explore this in a case study of how National Instruments implemented this foundational solution to power many new innovations, including an internal knowledge management application and faceted/guided navigation.
 
 
3:45
PM

 
Break
 
4:00
PM

 
Maieutic Parataxis: Exploring Concepts
Maieutic: The midwifery of knowledge.
Parataxis: The juxtaposition of ideas, without connection or conjunction

We will be hosting a series of five-minute vignettes drawn from topics and ideas that, while perhaps not yet fully formed, are likely to impact your thinking about how we design, build, and interact with software in the future.  
 
ii2008 Plenary
 
ii2008* Plenary Session
Tom Koulopoulos
The Delphi Group
 

 
5:15
PM

 
Free
5:45
PM

 
Buses leave The Scottsdale Plaza Resort for Evening Under the Stars
Buses will be leaving from the main entrance of The Scottsdale Plaza Resort*
 
*Guests of COFES Attendees must be registered and have paid a supplemental registration fee in order to attend this event 
6:30
PM

 
Evening Under the Stars at Desert Foothills
We're headed up into the desert once again, with truly wide-open spaces and a sweeping view of the sky. A great western cookout under the stars. And for those who want a closer look at the magnificent Arizona sky, we have a couple of major-league telescopes. A COFES highlight!
 
*Guests of COFES Attendees must be registered and have paid a supplemental registration fee in order to attend this event 
 
9:30
PM

 
Buses Leave the Evening Event for The Scottsdale Plaza Resort
We will return to the resort between 10:00 and 11:00 pm.
 

Saturday, April 12, 2008


12:00-
6:00
PM

 
Income Tax Extensions
In recognition of the impending tax deadline of April 15, Cyon Research has arranged for a tax specialist to be on hand to help file an extension for those who couldn't quite get it done before COFES.
8:00
AM

 
Breakfast
 
8:45
AM

 
Morning Kickoff
Your hosts will set the stage for the day’s activities.
9:00
AM

 
Keynote: Innovation and the Web
Mills Davis  
Mills Davis
Project10x
Innovation and the Web
The Web has emerged as a primary techno-socio-economic engine of global innovation. However, it is more than new infrastructure, technology, organization, and economics. The Web has become a social force transforming cultures, practices, values, and the way we experience the world. What’s next? The coming stage of internet evolution brings a fusion of communications, computing, and distributed intelligence, which we call Web 3.0. As the Web and the community of people and things comprising it gets smarter, the question innovative firms must answer is: how in the world do we exploit it?
 
Mills Davis is founder and managing director of Project10X, a Washington, DC based research consultancy specializing in next wave semantic technologies, solutions, and business models. The firm’s clients include technology manufacturers, global 2000 corporations, government agencies, and web 3.0 start-ups. Mills serves as principal investigator for the Semantic Wave 2008 research program. (A useful executive summary is available of the the report is available here.) A noted consultant and industry analyst, he has authored more than 100 reports, whitepapers, articles, and industry studies.
9:45
AM

 
Keynote: Making Stuff Sustainably
 
Terry Swack
Clean Culture
Climate change, energy, water, human health and ecological toxicity are major challenges. We are going to be required to address these issues and learn how to minimize our footprint. Many companies that want to change don't have a practical way of knowing the impacts of each decision they make.

Making stuff more sustainably can bring new opportunities, not only for increased efficiency and cost and risk reduction, but for innovation, access to new markets, new revenue, and brand loyalty. Companies use the design tools of CAD/CAE/CAM/PLM/BIM, etc. at the point in the process that a company can have the most control over making smart sustainability choices. What can we change about these tools to help them with that effort? There are many points of intervention and opportunities for innovation. Terry will shine a light on these opportunities to help our customers succeed in designing more sustainably.
 
Terry Swack is an environmental entrepreneur. She is also a 25-year veteran of the design and technology industries and a leading experience design strategist. The focus of her career has been to make complex ideas and new technologies useful, usable and desirable. Terry founded GreenBuildingBlocks.com and The Beam (now BlueEgg.com), a venture-backed Web 2.0 marketplace for consumers, manufacturers, and service providers to power the demand for clean and green products and services. She was a founding team member of the network security software company StillSecure, and as the firms’ vice-president responsible for “customer experience,” she developed a unique partnership with the engineering. Terry's first company, TSDesign, was an Internet strategy and product design firm founded in 1994 and later acquired by Razorfish. The development of the User Experience AuditSM in 1996 was the first offering of its kind and positioned the company as the industry leader in design analysis and user experience strategy. Terry is often asked to speak to business, technology and design audiences on designing effective digital business systems and the brand experience; and now on sustainability, business and culture.
 
10:30
AM

 
Break
 
10:45
AM

 
Discussions, Roundtables, and Appointments
We have set up rooms for meetings with a tight focus directed at specific groups of attendees. These 90-minute focused discussions are by the pool and near vendors' Technology Suites.
Discussions and Roundtables   Vendor Appointments

Cyon Research investigates issues in engineering and design. That research forms the basis for the issue topics for these group discussions. Meeting rooms are set up in suites around the pool, each with a different issue to discuss. Also, meetings among groups with a common interest.   

DP and PLM: Different Visions for Different Purposes — To someone outside our industry, the vision of DP (digital prototyping) may seem like just another way of saying “PLM” (product lifecycle management). The two visions have a common goal, but are executed with different methodologies. PLM confronts the challenge of automating engineering and manufacturing top-down, with global implementation. DP proffers a bottom-up, stepwise vision (DP). Some vendors have offerings in both camps. What’s the real difference between the two visions and what does this mean to the customer?

The Channel — All vendors are focused on building out channel capacity. At what point does it become a zero-sum game? What happens to organic growth when the channel reaches capacity? Until then, what are the major bottlenecks to building out the channel? Are these bottlenecks bigger than any one company (for example, too small a pool of experienced people)?

The Blurring Line Between AEC and MCAD — AEC and MCAD used to be entirely separate vertical markets, with no common ground between them. Their respective toolsets have gained in power, flexibility, and ease-of-use. At the same time, the users of such tools have become more sophisticated. Today, it is not uncommon to see AEC firms using Rhino for design, and there are third-party vendors delivering tools for architectural steel and concrete design built on top of SolidWorks and Inventor. Traditional AEC tools are also moving into manufacturing, notably project management and project portfolio management. What’s really going on here? Where will it end?

Social Network Mashups in Business — Wikis, multiplayer interactive games, and other Web 2.0 technologies are entering the workplace, and will affect business -- especially collaborative business functions such as project management. A group has been developing a white paper that describes the landscape of social networks and virtual worlds and clarifies the enhanced value propositions of these environments for business development and globalization. Their findings indicate that it is possible to organize a community of networks into a mediated community that produces value for an organization. While email and project collaboration networks have digitized and webified traditional dirt-world workflows, Web 2.0 technologies alternately promise and threaten radical process transformation. How will new-generation tools -- and the new generation of users who use them -- affect the roles, responsibilities, rights and risks of all project participants?

Educating the Next Crop of Engineers — What skills will they need? What will they not need to be taught (as most will be digital natives)? What are they likely to be lacking? What can be done within the existing education system (both K-12 and college)? What steps will business need to take to insure readiness for the next generation of engineers? How can we make sure there will not be a shortfall? What guidance/encouragement or investments should industry be bringing to bear upon the education of upcoming generations?

BIM in Construction — The construction industry has reached a tipping point. They know what BIM (building information management) is; they’ve seen it work; they can clearly see what BIM can do for their bottom line; and they know they have to get on board. As a result, we’re about to experience a period of explosive growth in demand for BIM software. This demand will not be fueled by traditional design users, but rather by the recipients of design data. What are the implications for software providers? How will this change the relationship between architect and builder? How do contracts and deliverables evolve?

Designing Software to Support Sustainability — What can we do to help our customers act more responsibly?What software and tools will be available to simulate the true life cycle costs of various design/manufacturing/service/operation/decommissioning alternatives? We simply don’t have much guidance on what alternatives will prove customer- and planet-friendly over the long haul. The availability of such tools might help us create the kinds of incentives or regulations needed to sustain healthy economies.

User Group Roundtable — Meeting among representatives of major user groups to discuss common issues and providing customer benefit. Representatives from boards of COE, PLM World, PTC/USER, etc. By invitation.  
 


 
ii2008up>* Session
Jack Ring
Cyon Research
The Serendipity of Innovation
Many of us chalk up great innovation to serendipity, from Velcro to Post it Notes to the microwave and vaccines. However, unless serendipity is followed by semantics, semiotics, and systemics, nobody wins. We’ll help you understand each factor and why all three are necessary, then see how to keep systematic process from suppressing creativity and how innovating innovation can greatly increase the chances of success for any invention. These principles and practices apply to situations ranging from molecular medicine to global ecology.
 
COFES 2008 will set up appointments in the Technology Suites for attendees, based on the information you provide in the registration form, to match you with the suites that hold the technologies and companies that will interest you. Your schedule will be given to you when you arrive. There are a limited number of pre-assigned appointments. During the Thursday evening reception you will have the opportunity to expand your schedule.
The following vendors are participating in COFES 2008 with Technology Suites:

Appointment times:
10:45
11:20
11:55
12:30
  1:05
  1:40
  2:15
  2:50
 
Lunch will be served in the Technology Suites for the 12:30 appointments
 
12:15
PM

 
Lunch
 
1:45
PM

 
Discussions and Roundtables
Similar to the morning sessions, with different topics.  

Visualizing the CAE Market — Engineering analysis is not just a complex set of applications, the domain of engineering analysis tools is also incredibly rich and complex, with capabilities that overlap in complex ways. How can we visualize what the engineering analysis market looks like? What differentiates real sectors of the market? What can we learn from trying to visualize it? How is the market evolving?

New Delivery Models for Software — As Web2.0 shapes up, Google & Amazon are demonstrating its value. With it come new ways to deliver functionality to users. SaaS (software as a service); On-demand; "Software Service"; and other models of functionality delivery are creating new opportunities and complexities. The industry may be in for a major shift as new technology/business models come into play.

BIM: Platform Stacks — The transition from CAD-based to BIM (building information modeling)-based design is in full swing. The use of BIM in design is no longer a novelty; already for many, it’s mandated. At the same time, vendors are adding significant richness to their BIM platforms. Platform “stacks” are common constructs in IT; consider the Microsoft, Oracle, IBM, Sun, and Open Source stacks. A similar construct is emerging in the AEC market, with significant stacks not only from Autodesk and Bentley, but also an IFC stack, and a hint of a future Intergraph stack. Where can this “stacks” view of the market lead us?

Social Production of Manufactured Goods — Social production is the process by which volunteers come together to create something of value. They act as a firm would without the command/control or even clear reward/compensation structures. There are numerous examples in what has come to be known as Open Source IT: Linux, Apache, MySQL, SugarCRM, etc. Examples in manufacturing are less apparent but growing: Mazda tapped into the social network Facebook to directly get its customers ideas about what the next Mazda3 should look like; Mountain Dew started a site that lets customers formulate their own personal flavor of beverage; and Bug Labs has released a configurable/modular hardware platform that lets the user design their own gadget and then write the software to make it work. What will the role of the manufacturer be when the users of the products are asked to be the designers? What are the implications for Intellectual property and product liability when ‘amateurs’ are given authority over design decisions? What can we learn from how IT has been transformed by Open Source social production?

GEN Y: Changing of the Guard — Kids who are growing up learning to collaborate with WOW (World of Warcraft) will have different expectations from a design tool than we do - and those "kids" will be in positions of leadership, with buying power, in less than 10 years. What will they expect their software to do? What are the implications for design firms?

Intellectual Property — Finding the balance between protecting knowledge and sharing it is the key to innovation and success. This applies not only to the relationship between design and manufacturing firms, but also between software firms and their users. Where do we draw the line between the right amount of control and stifling workflow and innovation? Can or should we rely on legal documents like EULAs and partnership contracts, or is there a business role for trust relationships? What about in sectors like AEC, where the parties to a project have traditionally had adversarial roles?

Compression — Our economy is built around continuous growth. “Grow or die” is not just a motto; it’s a corporate reality. On the other hand, the human “culture” is approaching the limits of our “global petri dish.” Enticing customers to dispose of their current goods just to replace them with the “latest and greatest” is not going to be a viable strategy for long. We are likely to enter an economic stage of “compression,” where design for the long term, design for consumer maintainability, design for reuse, etc. become our priorities. Do we have the right tools yet?  


 
ii2008* Session
Mills Davis
Project10x
Web 3.0
Still trying to get your arms around Web 2.0? Forget it! Web 3.0 is the next phase of internet evolution. It uses semantic technologies to cope with challenges of scale, complexity, security, and mobility, as well as provide intelligent, rich media interaction and autonomous behavior that make our experience of internet more relevant, useful, enjoyable (and profitable). This shift from information-centric to knowledge-centric patterns of computing and communication will fuel trillion-dollar economic expansions worldwide over the next decade.
 
 
3:15
PM

 
Break
 
3:30
PM

 
Working Session: The Business of Design and Engineering
We've seen where we're headed: Point B. Right now we're at Point A. As businesses and as an industry, what needs to happen in order for us to get from Point A to Point B? This working session is an open forum for examining the issues surrounding technologies expected to have an impact on design and engineering. The purpose of these discussions is to form a consensus on the issues faced, consider approaches, and promote further dialogue.
 
 
Joel Orr
Cyon Research
Setting the Agenda: The Far Future
Cyon Research focuses much of its energy looking beyond the next couple of years. This congress session will explore what we should expect, looking out six years and beyond, in terms of business environment, product development, customer demand, and other issues and implications.
 
 
Peter Marks
Design Insight
Back to Reality: The Near Future
This congress brings the discussion back to the reality of the business issues that face us today and the preparations we need to make to be ready for an ever-changing future.
 
 
5:00
PM

 
Free
5:30
PM

 
Reception
*Guests of COFES Attendees must be registered and have paid a supplemental registration fee in order to attend this event
6:30-
9:00
PM

 
Dinner and Awards
Dinner and the closing session of COFES and The CAD Society Industry Awards.*
 
*Guests of COFES Attendees must be registered and have paid a supplemental registration fee in order to attend this event 

Sunday, April 13, 2008


6:30-
8:30
AM

 
Early Riser's Breakfast (Cafe Cabana - Poolside)
For golfers and those with early flights
 
7:45
AM

 
Golf Scramble at The McCormick Ranch   Guests Leaving
A four-ball scramble at McCormick Ranch's renowned golf course. Meet at the COFES registration desk at 7:38 AM.

Lunch and prizes will be back at the resort immediately following the scramble.
Van to McCormick Ranch. $195 fee and reservation required (not included in COFES registration fee).
Transportation back to The Scottsdale Plaza Resort in time to make flights out of Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport scheduled for 3:00 PM or later.
 
Transportation to Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport
 
8:30-
10:30
AM

 
Sunday Brunch
Sunday Brunch (Cafe Cabana - Poolside)
Relax and enjoy the morning!
 
10:30
AM

 
Intern Session
Each year at the end of COFES we sit down with the students who intern at COFES. This engaging and wide-ranging discussion has been incredibly enlightening--perhaps for them, but even more so for us. These next-generation leaders have much to contribute.
 

* This year, for the first time, we have invited ii2008 to be co-located with COFES 2008. ii2008 attendees will be joining us for the meals and keynotes and are welcome to attend other COFES 2008 sessions. COFES 2008 attendees are also welcome to attend ii2008 sessions.
 

ii2008 is Innovation Insights 2008. The conference discusses strategies for driving innovation and has a focus on managing knowledge. 2008 will be the sixth year for the event, which caters to an audience of industry CIOs. The presentations shine a light on drivers of innovation and provide hands on experience with innovation generation and tools.