COFES 2010 Agenda

Thursday, April 15, 2010

8:00
AM
Registration and Badge Pick-up Opens

Attire for COFES is weekend casual (no suits); shirts with collars; sandals or sneakers. Shorts are okay.  

8:30
AM -
3:00
PM
The DaS Symposium

The Design and Sustainability Symposium: Exploring the intersection of design, simulation, and sustainability for the built (AEC) and manufactured environment. Details here.

3:00
PM

 
Special Session: Clouds and GPU Clouds
Peddie~Jon_88w.jpg  
Jon Peddie
Jon Peddie Research
The cloud brings the singularity closer
Jon’s thesis is that “we can and will tap into the enormous computing resource of the cloud (including GPU cloud) as a compute utility as we do now for our other utilities like electricity and water.” Everyone can and will use the cloud as a compute resource – some without even knowing it. Augmented reality is one driver – there are others. Of course the issue of when this will occur is still unclear, but Jon thinks he has answers to that too. Bring your arguments and an open mind – thinking allowed.
 
As last year, this is an informal session. Lots of information, but also lots of interaction and discussion.
Open to all COFES Attendees and their guests.
4:00
PM

 
Special Session: International Business Update
Thorne~Peter~88w.jpg  
Peter Thorne
Cambashi
International business update
 
Cambashi maintains quantitative market models of the global technical applications software business. Prior year revenue figures by country contain tantalizing clues and reflections of the ways different industries and regions responded to changing economic circumstances. By looking at the numbers, and relating these to developments in technology and industrial practice around the world, we can consider how general economic forecasts might translate to technical application software businesses.
 
This is an informal session. Lots of information, but also lots of interaction and discussion.
Open to all COFES Attendees and their guests.
5:00
PM

 
Special Session: Challenges of Realistically Simulating Manufacturing
Tilove~Robert_88web.jpg  
Bob Tilove
General Motors Research & Development
Challenges of Realistically Simulating Manufacturing
Digital prototyping (DP) and product lifecycle management (PLM) systems have always implied the promise of a realistic virtual manufacturing system (VMS). While there are useful VMSs available today, several challenges remain to be solved before a truly realistic VMS is achieved. GM’s Bob Tilove, will present his vision, implications, and related R&D challenges for going beyond realistic VMS to create virtual simulated work environments (VSWEs). VSWEs are targeted for the design and validation of general (or final) assembly, maintenance and repair operations typical in defense, automotive, aerospace, capital goods, and many other industries. The key characteristic of VSWEs is that they involve human operators, maintenance workers, or war fighters manipulating and assembling both flexible and rigid parts, requiring the exertion of force.
 
As last year, this is an informal session. Lots of information, but also lots of interaction and discussion.
Open to all COFES Attendees and their guests.
6:00 -
8:00
PM

 
Business Reception and Technology Suite Open House   Spouse & Guest-only Mixer 
Opening business reception. First formal opportunity for COFES Newbies to meet their Hosts. Technology Suites have been set up for you to discuss corporate direction, business development, and potential partnerships. They are NOT demo rooms—the vendors are here to talk, not sell. This is your opportunity to sign up for appointment time slots.
Music, food and refreshments.
*Restricted to COFES 2010 Attendees. Their spouses and guests are invited to a spouse- and guest-only mixer and may join them later at the welcome reception.
 
While COFES Attendees are at their business reception, their spouses and guests will be treated to a wine tasting mixer/reception before they join us in the welcome reception at 8 pm. Enjoy the food, refreshments, and music in a relaxed setting.
*Open only to badged spouses/guests of COFES 2010 attendees.
 
7:45
PM

 
COFES 2010 Opening Intro

 

Welcome, introductions, orientation, and schedule.
8:00 -
10:00
PM

 
Welcome Reception
Bring your spouse and join all COFES Attendees and sponsors for this evening social.
Music, food and refreshments.
*Guests of COFES Attendees must be registered and must be wearing their badges during the event.
 

Friday, April 16, 2010


7:30
AM

 
Introductions and Breakfast
Each COFES attendee from the user community is assigned a leading industry consultant who will act as their host for the event. The host's primary responsibility is to make sure that you get the most value possible out of the event and introduce you to key industry players. Plan to meet your host/introducer for breakfast.
 
Attire for COFES is weekend casual (no suits); shirts withcollars; sandals or sneakers. Shorts are okay.
8:30
AM

 
Kickoff: Opening Session and Call to Order
Your hosts, Cyon Research, will set the stage for the day's activities.
 
9:00
AM

 
Keynote: From Product Informatics to BioInformatics 
Moghadam~Omid_88w.jpg  
Omid Moghadam
Center for Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School
There is a new, disruptive opportunity for engineering software vendors to play in the bioinformatics sector. As an inventor (he holds 32 patents) and leader straddling both the engineering and healthcare domains, Omid is in a unique position to address the applicability of the resources of the engineering software community to the developing needs of the explosively growing field of Bioinformatics and Genomics. He'll discuss how software vendors from design and engineering fields can take advantage of this disruptive opportunity.
 
 
Omid Moghadam
Omid Moghadam is the chair of the National Development Board for the Ingnite Institute for Individual Health and recently joined Harvard Medical School’s Center for Biomedical Informatics. Moghadam is perhaps best known for his work at Intel as head of product strategy. During his tenure at Intel, Moghadam led the team responsible for Intel’s push into 3D graphics. His experience at COFES provided much of the proof point for his team which eventually resulted in the definition of project Alamee, which evolved into Intel’s new Larabee chip. Later, still at Intel, Moghadam led Intel’s research into the needs of the healthcare industry. After leaving Intel, he founded Dossia Corporation, a national network for consumer-owned health records.

Previously, he was the Global Director for Intel Genomics, an Intel division focused on providing services to the Genomics market. Prior to joining Intel Genomics, he founded Dossia Corporation (www.dossia.org), a corporation that has created a national network for storing life long consumer owned health records. Mr. Moghadam served as Dossia Chief Executive for three years. Before Dossia, Mr. Moghadam was the head of product strategy at Intel, where he led the transition of the corporation from single to multiple core processors.
10:15
AM

 
Technology Suite Briefings 
Our Technology Suite vendors will present briefings on their advanced technology and research.
 
Autodesk
Teresa Anania
Director, Industry Management
Combining Industry Workflows to Gain Competitive Advantage
A look at how Autodesk is combining Digital Prototyping (DP) and Building Information Modeling (BIM) to revolutionize manufacturing facility design, layout, and simulation.
 
 
HP
Tom Salomone
MDA Segment Manager - Worldwide
The Digital Workbench
This new concept is having a significant impact in the industry. We will discuss new products for engineers, and how they are changing the way engineers, designers and architects collaborate, innovate and perform.
 
 
Microsoft
Don Richardson
Director, Global Innovation and PLM Industry Strategy
Extending the Reach of Product Information to the Enterprise and Beyond
Microsoft will discuss how product-driven businesses can take advantage of new and upcoming technologies to extend the reach of information beyond domain specialists to all active participants and get the most from their existing PLM investments. Additionally, Microsoft will explore opportunities facilitated by high performance computing and cloud services.
 
 
PTC
John Fox
Director, Product and Market Strategy, Insight Product and Technology
Leveraging Analytics to Improve Product Environmental Performance
Analytics are at the core of understanding the environmental footprint of a manufacturer’s products. In order to drive continuous improvement, manufacturers must move beyond compliance and start optimizing for environmental performance. PTC will discuss how their analytics tools make this possible, even when the information available is incomplete and in vastly different states of accuracy, precision, and granularity.
 
 
Sescoi
Tim Bell
Director, Business Development
Design for Manufacturing Optimization
Advanced analysis tools integrated into PLM can leverage engineering analysis and CAM analysis to optimize manufacturability. With the right tools, deployment, security, cost, and CAD system expertise should no longer be obstacles. All stakeholders can have real-time access to the latest design data without waiting for a file conversion step. This technology promises to go beyond manufacturing feasibility, and make concurrent engineering for manufacturing optimization a reality.
 
10:55
PM

 
Break
 
11:00
AM

 
Analyst and User Briefings
We've invited some of the brightest and most talented thinkers, analysts and users, to each lead a working discussion on an issue they view as critical. These discussions are strictly limited to no more than 24 people at a time.
 
Moghadam~Omid.jpg  
Omid Moghadam
Center for Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School
Keynoter's Session
An interactive discussion on the topics raised in Omid's keynote.
 
Deragisch~Bob_88w.jpg  
Bob Deragisch
Parker Hannifin
Living with Heterogeneous Systems
As a typical Tier-1 systems provider in an engineering-focused industry, Parker Aerospace has grown both organically and through acquisition and merger. One result of the latter is the challenge of dealing with many different software tools that each  serve similar functions, but with different constituencies within the organization. Also, many 'best-of-breed' solutions common across the organization are not integrated.
Hall~Ken_88w.jpg  
Ken Hall
Gensler
Sustainability at Gensler
Ken Hall is responsible for sustainable design systems at Gensler. He’ll discuss both Gensler’s view of its role in sustainability and the role sustainability plays at Gensler, the world s largest architecture firm.
Smith~Deke_88w.jpg  
Deke Smith
Cyon Research
Tools for Change in BIM
3D visualization, walk throughs, and simulations help us communicate our understanding of how a facility will actually be used. We need similar tools to help us evaluate and improve the productivity of the people or processes that occupy those same facilities. We need tools that help us evaluate and communicate how our choices impact ALL of the costs (including sustainability factors) AND the tradeoff of those costs against productivity gains – a true lifecycle assessment.
Slansky~Dick_88w  
Dick Slansky
ARC Advisory Group
Collaborative Tools for Production Systems
Although digital manufacturing can model both a product’s design and its production system, few tools integrate the model of a production system’s automation and controls. Engineering these systems remains a bottleneck. Recently, we’ve seen the emergence of collaborative digital automation tools. Are they up to the task of fixing the bottleneck?
Brown~Don_88w.jpg  
Don Brown
Collaborative Product Development Associates
Mechatronics Update
The fragmented domains (mechanical, electronic, software) that intersect in Mechatronics must begin integration at the earliest stages of design. A Mechatronics framework could facilitate tracking of design changes across those domains in support of active collaboration. Join Don in a discussion of recent industry progress toward such a framework.
Jackson_Chad88w.jpg  
Chad Jackson
Aberdeen Group
Baked vs. Flexible PLM
PLM adoption levels have been growing. and some small and medium businesses (SMBs) have been harvesting real value from PLM. What's the next step in PLM for an SMB? A popular view on PLM for SMBs in recent years has been that it should be focused on the product development fundamentals (PDM, design release and change management) and should be delivered in an out-of-the-box (OOTB) or templated solution. Can SMB’s get the next increment in value from PLM without extensive customization?
Vleeschhouwer~Jay_88w.jpg  
Jay Vleeschhouwer
Ticonderoga Securities
The View from Wall Street
Jay will review the performance of the CAD/PLM companies and industry during the recession and their prospects for 2010 and beyond as we emerge from the downturn. Formerly a senior analyst and managing director with Merrill Lynch, Jay has recently joined Ticonderoga Securities as senior software analyst and managing director. This will be his 9th annual review of the industry at COFES, and your only opportunity to see him in something besides a business suit.
11:50
AM

 
Analyst and User Briefings
Analyst and user briefings, round 2, with different analysts, different topics.

Jarrett~Jon_88w.jpg  
Jon Jarrett
ATK Launch Systems
Integrated Business Process
Too many major programs end up over budget and behind schedule, due in part to: poor planning; inadequate resourses; poor requirements; unrealistic schedules; weak project management, etc. Why do these issues creep up over and over again, even in critical projects? Is it possible to develop an integrated systems approach?
Fischer~Martin_88w  
Martin Fischer
Center for Integrated Facility Engineering
Predicting Building Performance
Advancements in modeling, sensing, visualization, and machine-learning offer unprecedented opportunities to learn about the design, construction, and operation of the built environment. Surprisingly, comparatively little is known about the actual performance of the built environment, especially for complex buildings and infrastructure projects dependent on synergies among systems. What are our current capabilities of predicting and achieving performance? Where do we go from here?
France~Chris_88w.jpg  
Chris France
Little Diversified Architectural Consulting
BIM and the Cloud
AEC is embracing BIM. The “I” of BIM supports analysis and simulation of building performance, “what if” optimizations, automated spec writing, and hooks into clients’ real estate and procurement supply chain databases, etc. Mobility and processing power are a necessity for this collaboration to work. Join Chris in a discussion of these issues and how his firm has coupled virtual/cloud computing technology to BIM to overcome the technical obstacles, and reduce the costs of IT infrastructure.
Riff~Richard~88w.jpg  
Richard Riff
Ford Motor Company
Role of Sustainability in PLM
Sustainability is important for success in the market place. Products and processes need to be developed with a view towards sustainability—both regulatory and voluntary. PLM can play a key role. Ford’s approach to PLM's role in sustainability follows an enterprise view of the cost and benefits of sustainability. Our conclusion is that we need to have a standards-driven approach to enable lifecycle visibility and integration of sustainability considerations; we do not see the need for new tools for sustainability data management.
Wolfe~Steve_88w.jpg  
Steve Wolfe
Cyon Research
Coordinating Analysis and Test
Nobody believes analytical predictions except the analyst. Everybody believes test results except the test engineer. How can analysis and testing be better coordinated to raise confidence in the results of both?
Jordani~David_88w.jpg  
Dave Jordani
Jordani Consulting Group
BIM from the Owner's Chair
The business case for BIM is compelling to building owners, due in part to a leaner FM process informed by facility lifecycle data. What can be done at the design and construction stages to increase those benefits to FM downstream? Who bears the additional cost of those benefits? How do we extend collaboration to include FM?
Behrens~Allan_88w.jpg  
Allan Behrens
Taxal Limited
Cloud and Channel
Cloud-based and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) offerings are coming. Is the channel ready? Indeed, what change is needed? Is there an opportunity to adapt or extend partner networks to take advantage of emerging trends in the market?
12:40
PM

 
Lunch
 
2:15
PM

 
Technology Suite Briefings 
Round 2 of briefings from COFES Technology Suite vendors.
 
 
Autodesk
Teresa Anania
Director, Industry Management
Combining Industry Workflows to Gain Competitive Advantage
A look at how Autodesk is combining Digital Prototyping (DP) and Building Information Modeling (BIM) to revolutionize manufacturing facility design, layout, and simulation.
 
 
Intel
Wes Shimanek
Senior Manager, Workstations
Leveraging Software and Hardware Advancements
New advancements in hardware and software can change the way you design and develop new products. Learn how Intel-based hardware and ISV software technologies are changing, and how they can leveraged to enable exploration of “what if” ideas, and the potential impact of “what else” technologies.
 
 
Microsoft
Don Richardson
Director, Global Innovation and PLM Industry Strategy
Extending the Reach of Product Information to the Enterprise and Beyond
Microsoft will discuss how product-driven businesses can take advantage of new and upcoming technologies to extend the reach of information beyond domain specialists to all active participants and get the most from their existing PLM investments. Additionally, Microsoft will explore opportunities facilitated by high performance computing and cloud services.
 
 
PTC
Leland McLaughlin
Relex, Vice-President of Operations
Best Practices in Reliability Management
News stories abound about product recalls and what manufacturers need to do about ensuring product quality. PTC will discuss reliability management and its benefits; the challenges to product reliability; and the need for implementing a best-practice approach.
 
 
Sescoi
Tim Bell
Director, Business Development
Merging Reverse Engineering, Hybrid Design, and CNC
Hybrid design systems integrate scan data with standard design, which is especially useful for one-off, application-specific parts. The method is particularly effective at creating products for incorporation into pre-existing mating systems quickly and accurately. Medical and dental solutions tailored to the unique anatomical needs of one patient are among the many application for this technology. The next step will be to integrate hybrid design with CNC, for “one button” CAD/CAM integration. Sescoi will discuss its progress towards this vision.
 
3:00
PM

 
Analyst and User Briefings
Analyst briefings, round 3, with different analysts, different topics.
 
Llewellyn~Rick_88w.jpg  
Rick Llewellyn
HDR Engineering
Getting IT & Business Talking the Same Language
IT and “the business” often have different goals. In order to align business and IT goals, it’s critical to not only to establish credibility, trust, and partnership, but also to strive to place goals in common language. Business staff wants IT help to mitigate risks and take fiscal responsibility. Business wants innovative solutions to improve delivery time, at lower costs and better quality. What are current best practices and how can we evolve beyond them?
Tardif~Michael_88w.jpg  
John Tocci
Gilbane Building Company
Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) in Practice
What’s changed with BIM & VDC since the beginning of our current recession? We’re still sandbagged by training, inelegant interoperability solutions, heavy computing requirements, and lack of in-depth best practices, even as we work towards a recovery and more collaborative processes. How does software need to change over the next 24/48/60 months to allow industry practitioners to design, engineer and build it better, faster, sustainably and for the price promised?
Panushev~Ivan_88web.jpg  
Ivan Panushev
Georgia Institute of Technology
What Happens After BIM?
Building Information Modeling (BIM) has had dramatic impacts on the processes of design and construction, with many new practices. What are the opportunities after BIM?
Stavanja~Rick_88w.jpg  
Rick Stavanja
Wagstaff
Deploying Next-Generation PLM
The latest versions of PLM software from PTC, Siemens, DS, and others have taken advantage of .NET-like improvements that have a big impact on implementation. Rick Stavanja has just completed one such transition and lives to discuss his experience.
Halpern~Marc_88w.jpg  
Marc Halpern
Gartner
Simulation 2020
What will simulation look like in the year 2020? What technical, process, and cultural developments will influence the directions of simulation practice over the next ten years? Look back at lessons learned from 30+ years of CAE and how we can use those lessons to expand the strategic and effective impact of simulation.
De Neef~Christian_88w.jpg  
Christian DeNeef
Fast Track Consulting
Crowdsourcing Engineering
Crowdsourcing is a distributed problem-solving approach, whereby “Seekers” broadcast challenges to “Solvers” (the crowd). In the end, "Seekers" select and reward the best solution(s). Crowdsourcing is coming to the engineering community. Challenges include technology, process, legal, competency, organizational, and financial. Will it fly? What are the implications for software vendors?
 
Monica Schnitger
Schnitger Corporation
VAR Evolution
Successful VARs have evolved from small shops that sold boxed software and provided some services to sophisticated, professionally-run businesses that often develop or customize software, in addition to providing high-value services and support. The channel is continuing to evolve. What do VARs need to do to thrive in the next transition? Is the door open for others to make the same transition? What other, more reliable revenue streams are open to VARs? How will/should the relationship with their OEM partners evolve?
3:45
PM

 
Break
 
4:00
PM

 
First Congress: Maieutic Parataxis
Maieutic: The midwifery of knowledge.
Parataxis: The juxtaposition of ideas, without connection or conjunction

We will be hosting a series of five-minute vignettes drawn from topics and ideas that, while perhaps not yet fully formed, are likely to impact your thinking about how we design, build, and interact with software in the future.

Take a look at http://cofes.com/mp to see the Maieutic Parataxis presentations from previous COFES!
 
5:15
PM

 
Free
5:45
PM

 
Buses leave The Scottsdale Plaza Resort for Evening Under the Stars
Buses will be leaving from the main entrance of The Scottsdale Plaza Resort*
 
*Guests of COFES Attendees must be registered and have paid a supplemental registration fee in order to attend this event
6:30
PM

 
Evening Under the Stars
We're headed out into truly wide-open spaces and a sweeping view of the sky once again. A first for COFES, we're headed to Arizona Wing Commemorative Airforce, featuring a B17G Flying Fortress and other planes of a bygone era. A great western cookout, and for those who want a closer look at the magnificent Arizona sky, we have a couple of major-league telescopes. A COFES highlight!
 
*Guests of COFES Attendees must be registered and have paid a supplemental registration fee in order to attend this event
 
9:30
PM

 
Buses Leave the Evening Event for The Scottsdale Plaza Resort
We will return to the resort between 10:00 and 11:00 pm.
 

Saturday, April 17, 2010


8:00
AM

 
Breakfast
 
8:45
AM

 
Morning Kickoff
Your hosts will set the stage for the day’s activities.
9:00
AM

 
Keynote: Got Mojo?
Burlingham~Bo_88w.jpg  
Bo Burlingham
Inc. Magazine

 
Bo Burlingham
Bo Burlingham is an editor-at-large of Inc. magazine and chairman of the Small Giants Community. His book Small Giants: Companies That Choose To Be Great Instead of Big was one of five finalists for the 2006 Financial Times/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year award. His most recent book, co-authored with Norm Brodsky, is The Knack: How Street-Smart Entrepreneurs Learn to Handle Whatever Comes Up.

Bo joined Inc. in January 1983 as a senior editor and became executive editor six months later. In 1990, he resigned so that he could do more writing and became editor-at-large. Subsequently he wrote two books with Jack Stack, the co-founder and CEO of Springfield Remanufacturing Corp. and the pioneer of open-book management. One of the books, The Great Game of Business, has sold more than 300,000 copies. The other, A Stake in the Outcome, has been called “the first management classic of the new millennium.” Bo co-authors with Norm Brodsky the popular monthly column in Inc. called “Street Smarts,” which was the winner of a gold “AZBEE” award from the American Society of Business Publication Editors in 2008, and a finalist for a National Magazine Award in 2006 and 2008. Burlingham served on the board of The Body Shop Inc., the U.S. subsidiary of the international skin and hair care company, from 1992 to 1997.
10:30
AM

 
Break
 
10:45
AM

 
Discussions, Roundtables, and Appointments
We have set up rooms for meetings with a tight focus directed at specific groups of attendees. These 90-minute focused discussions are by the pool and near vendors' Technology Suites.
Discussions and Roundtables   Vendor Appointments
Cyon Research investigates issues in engineering and design. That research forms the basis for the issue topics for these group discussions. Meeting rooms are set up in suites around the pool, each with a different issue to discuss. Also, meetings among groups with a common interest.

 

Best Practices Aren’t Good Enough—“Best practices” aren’t good enough anymore. They’re a crowd-sourced starting point—a snapshot of what we know that works best at a point in time. “Best practices” did not prevent Toyota’s accelerator problems, Airbus’ and Boeing’s significant delays, or help New Orleans’ post-Katrina cleanup efforts.
   “Best practices,” by definition, are continually evolving—sometimes in reaction to a catastrophic failure, sometimes through innovation and continuous improvement. At past COFES meetings, we’ve discussed design, engineering, sustainability, and innovation. We’ve all asked, “What ‘best practices’ should we adopt?” By and large the response has been to repeat the past, only better, faster, and cheaper. At COFES 2010, we’re asking “What can we do to make ourselves and our customers more effective innovators?” and “How can we innovate in the development of better practices?”

  Bridging the Gaps Between “As Designed” and “As Manufactured”—EDA+MCAD+CAE+Software=Theory;  Manufacturing=Reality
   Today’s products are a complex web of mechanical design, electronics and controls, software, etc. Our tools have evolved to address design one discipline at a time—and our universities are similarly compartmentalized. We are only just starting down the road to design toolboxes that address the full spectrum of design.
   But that won’t get us where we need to go. Our tools——EDA+MCAD+CAE+software——can take us to a complete virtual project. But as anyone who has worked in a machine shop or construction site knows, there’s a lot of “reality” to deal with before that virtual project can be realized.
   The higher-education process is similarly disconnected: Theory is taught, but reality is learned through experience.
   Is there a way to address both?

  The Cloud—What’s It Going To Cost Me?:Evolving Business and Delivery Models for Software—There’s been a great deal of talk about how the cloud is going to (pick one: save, cost) customers money. Much of the uncertainty revolves around how vendors are going to change their business model to adapt to new delivery models.
   We’ve seen some of the options before: SaaS (software-as-a-service); perpetual-use licenses; rental; annual licenses; tokens; site licenses, license-per-CPU, per core, per person, per machine…, but it’s still not clear what it will look like in the context of engineering with the cloud. Factors such as where it’s hosted, shared servers, hotel’d server, or behind the firewall also come in to play.
   What are the primary motivations for moving to The Cloud? What is the financial impact? Is it good or bad for customers? For vendors? What about the channel?

  The Future of MCAD—Spaceclaim, Kubotek, and PTC’s purchase of CoCreate re-ignited the debate over explicit/direct versus history-based 3D modeling. Siemens PLM’s Synchronous Technology and Autodesk’s Inventor Fusion added fuel to the fire. Dassault Systemes hasn’t been left out either, with its V6 technology. It seems everyone’s been jumping on a variant of a geometry kernel that permits the user to edit the model without understanding how it was created.
   On the other hand, feature-based parametric modeling still has significant advantages. Is direct editing the future of MCAD? What about Functional Modeling? Or Decision-driven Design? What are the fundamental limitations of each of these alternatives? What will a design system of the future need to resolve in order to surpass them?

  The Evolving Intersection of PLM and BIM—The lines between the information management needs of AEC and manufacturing have blurred to the point that PLM systems are being asked to accommodate BIM data, and vice-versa. For example, a window manufacturer designs with an MCAD tool; supplies IFC data to an AEC CAD tool; and passes energy performance data to be used by an energy analysis software package, as well as maintenance and warranty data, which must be passed on to the owner. All of this can be managed by a combination of PLM and BIM systems. What information needs to be tracked by each? Where do the handoffs occur and what do they look like? What about analysis and compliance data? What sort of data mountains will be created by the metaphoric crashing of the tectonic plates of PLM and BIM?

  Social Networking: Living with Too Many Channels—Back in the early days of AT&T, when phone operators plugged cables to connect calls, someone predicted that the growth of phone usage would soon create a situation wherein every person in the country would need to be a phone operator in order to handle the capacity of switching necessary. Well, that did happen—just not the way it was envisioned. The touch-tone phone replicated the function of the switchboard, and everyone became an operator.
   News reporting seems to be going the same way, with everyone now equipped to be an on-the-scene video reporter or blogger.
   In the early days of social networking, it was technically feasible for a determined person to maintain communication on each of the business-related social networks that they might need to interact with. Today, it seems that each customer, supplier, or investor, has their own social network, CRM system, BoM system, or some other channel, RSS feed, or other connection that you MUST engage with. It seems like these systems are fragmenting and spreading fractally. While some of these networks do interconnect, it appears that we must begin to choose where to focus our attention.
   What are the implications for the vast expansion of channels of information with widely uneven content and variable value? It’s going to get worse. Other than the ostrich maneuver, what strategies make sense?

  Is It Time to Leverage CAx/xxM for Mushrooming Markets?—CAx/xxM (PDM/PLM/BIM) tools have made it possible for manufacturing and construction enterprises to leverage product intelligence for business data and analytics. Two key questions remain: First, how to overcome challenges to widespread adoption beyond the silos of design and manufacturing? Second, how can we apply these technologies to fields like genomics, nanotechnology, and genetic programming? Can we leverage the Innovator’s Dilemma to be disruptive in such future high-growth areas? (The Innovator’s Dilemma, as defined in Clay Christiansen’s eponymous book, has to do with being caught up in profitable processes and missing the Next Big Thing in a market.)

  User Group Leadership Roundtable—Meeting among representatives of major user groups to discuss common issues and providing customer benefit. Representatives from boards of AUGI, COE, PLM World, PTC/USER, SWUGN, etc. By invitation.
 
COFES 2010 will set up appointments in the Technology Suites for attendees, based on the information you provide in the registration form, to match you with the suites that hold the technologies and companies that will interest you. Your schedule will be given to you when you arrive. There are a limited number of pre-assigned appointments. During the Thursday evening reception you will have the opportunity to expand your schedule.

Vendors participating in COFES 2010 with Technology Suites include:
Appointment times:
10:45
11:20
11:55
12:30
 1:05
 1:40
 2:15
 2:50
 
Lunch will be served in the Technology Suites for the 12:30 appointments
 
12:15
PM

 
Lunch
 
1:45
PM

 
Discussions and Roundtables, Round 2
Design and Sustainability—The DaS (design and sustainability) Symposium, which precedes COFES, attempts to address the question: “What can we (the software industry) do for our customers to help them design more responsibly?” The topic for this Roundtable will be decided at the DaS Symposium and announced on Saturday.

  BIM for Design ≠ BIM for Construction—There’s a gap in BIM—between the BIM model the architects and engineers create to define what is to be built, and the BIM model that the contractor needs to design the process of building it. Think of the former as a “model of the product” and the latter as “model of the process that builds the product.”
   Fortunately, this disconnect may be both necessary and desirable. Why? Should we try to go beyond that? Are there lessons to be learned from the similarities with manufacturing?

  A Sea Change in the Way We Work?—In the past 5 years we’ve seen developments in wireless, power management, and weight, and have had the slate’s road paved with massive consumer acceptance of iPhone apps. With engineering apps moving to the cloud, we may be on the verge of a massive shift in the way people take their work with them; probably not the end of workstations, but still a fundamental shift. Five years ago, we wondered if tablet PCs would have an impact on the way we work. They were a great idea, but the pieces were not yet in place to make them successful. Can the same be said for the coming generation of slate computing? Perhaps not.
   Are we prepared? How do we support it? Is it a control issue? What about my IP? What are the key things we need to address BEFORE the shift happens?

  Moving Design and Manufacturing to the Doctor’s Office—It is amazing to observe the transfer of technology from a mature industry to one that is just emerging: Witness the transfer of CAx technology from industrial manufacturing to medical device fabrication.
   Industrial manufacturing has refined CAx through years of trial, error, and billions of dollars in investment capital. The market for mass-personalized medical devices is beginning to reap the benefits of adopting it. Dental and other prosthetics can now be manufactured at the doctor’s office from data that is scanned and processed within a doctor’s office, something that used to take weeks, and happened at several remote locations. How does the data to support these manufacturing requirements integrate with existing systems for managing medical compliance documents? Conversely, what is missing from PLM that would be necessary to manage the medical compliance requirements for prosthetic manufacturing?

  What will it take to make analysis by designers practical?—For a generation, CAE companies have talked about making analysis attractive to engineers and designers who lack specialized education. Although progress has been made—particularly in AEC— most analysis is still done by specialists.
   What it will take to bring analysis to the majority of designers? What role will specialists play in this transformation?

  Free Apps, Point Solutions (best-in-class), or Integrated Product Suites?—Free apps are here to stay. As are traditional, fee-based tightly integrated engineering applications.
   Not all of those integrated applications are best in their class. Cyon Research’s data shows that only a fifth of customers surveyed have a strong preference for a tightly integrated suite at the expense of access to best-in-class solutions. (Of the rest, customers are evenly split on their preference for best-of-breed solutions that can communicate with each other versus those that might require some integration work by the firm.)
   Will knitting free and best-in-class applications together become a standard way to populate the engineer’s toolbox? How much will depend on whether a move to cloud-based apps (and other developments) makes data portability better or worse? Which is best in what circumstances? What role will pricing and bundling play? What can software vendors and their extended ecosystems do to bolster the suite approach? Should they?

  Going Beyond “Baked-In” PLM—Consider that business assets are often generated within business silos, and those silos handle data in a way that is convenient for them, but not for the rest of the enterprise. What will it take to “de-silo” product/project data? Current practice with PLM, as with many other major, top-down, enterprise projects, is to first understand the enterprise, then implement and customize the PLM system that “bakes in” all that was learned about the enterprise, along with current best practices. In some cases, particularly in small- to medium-size business space, PLM firms have developed common models or templates to shortcut the process, by getting the starting point much closer to the way a company works (or wants to work).
   If the PLM system has the design “baked in,” what happens as business needs change? What happens when new best practices emerge? No matter how productive the PLM system is at first, without the flexibility to rapidly adjust for changing conditions, it can become a drag on an evolving business. How do you balance the need for flexibility with the need to keep control of business processes? If your process is “baked in,” you have a high cost of change. If it’s flexible, you lower the cost of the change, but you still have to think about downstream impact. Who’s responsible?
 
3:15
PM

 
Break
 
3:30
PM

 
Second Congress - The Business of Design and Engineering
Holtz~Brad_88w
Brad Holtz
Cyon Research
  Marks~Peter_88w Peter Marks
Design Insight
  Brown~Jim_88w Jim Brown
Tech-Clarity
 

 
A presentation of recent Cyon Research studies and of a joint study by Cyon Research, Design Insight, and Tech-Clarity, followed by a moderated congress discussion of the findings and implications.
This working congress session is an open forum for examining the issues surrounding technologies expected to have an impact on design and engineering. The purpose of these discussions is to examine current issues, explore opportunities for a brighter future, consider approaches, and promote further dialogue.

5:00
PM

 
Free
5:30
PM

 
Reception
*Guests of COFES Attendees must be registered and have paid a supplemental registration fee in order to attend this event
6:30-
9:00
PM

 
Dinner and Awards
Dinner and the closing session of COFES, including The CAD Society Industry Awards and the CADwire Innovator's Award.*
 
*Guests of COFES Attendees must be registered and have paid a supplemental registration fee in order to attend this event 

Sunday, April 18, 2010


6:30-
8:30
AM

 
Early Riser's Breakfast (Cafe Cabana - Poolside)
For golfers and those with early flights
 
6:28
AM

 
Golf     Guests Leaving
Grab a bite at the early riser's breakfast and meet at the COFES registration desk at 6:28 AM for your 6:56 AM tee time.

Lunch back at the resort immediately following the scramble.
Golf fee and reservation required (Golf fee is not included in COFES registration fee).
Transportation back to The Scottsdale Plaza Resort in time to make flights out of Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport scheduled for 3:00 PM or later.
 
Transportation to Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport
 
8:30-
10:30
AM

 
Sunday Brunch
Sunday Brunch (Cafe Cabana - Poolside)
Relax and enjoy the morning!
 
10:00
AM

 
Special Session: Peter Marks
Each year at the end of COFES we sit down with the students who intern at COFES. This engaging and wide-ranging discussion has been incredibly enlightening--perhaps for them, but even more so for us. These next-generation leaders have much to contribute.

All COFES Interns will take part as equal participants with the other COFES attendees.  
 
 

Peter Marks 
Design Insight

Blind Spotting: FACTS FIRST
 
Peter Marks has a track record of predicting what's next at the intersection of technology and human behavior. For example, he predicted the dot.com boom several years ago at COFES and more importantly described how to sort the eventual winners from the losers based on customer buying principles.

His "Blind Spotting" keynote last year was based on his research on perceptual and cognitive filters and their impact on our current business challenges. We humans have more than fifty filtering mechanisms—blind spots if you will. The good news is they keep us focused. The bad news is that many of these filters are better evolved for detecting such things as saber toothed tigers than such risks as sub-prime mortgage based derivatives.

In this highly interactive discussion, Peter will explain not only how his theory had evolved into "FACTS FIRST", but more importantly, how FACTS FIRST can be applied to practical problems.